Truvada®: PrEPared for a decision on the scope of an SPC

Reading time: 3 minutes

Case No. O2017_023 | Hearing of 4 April 2019

Note that Hepp Wenger Ryffel is involved in this case on behalf of the defendant.
Gilead’s Truvada®

This case is about an alleged infringement of Gilead’s SPC C00915894; the basic patent is EP 0 915 894 B1 (see EPO Register and Swissreg). Gilead’s product is Truvada®, a pharmaceutical for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. The present main proceedings are following-up on summary proceedings S2017_006 when the FPC granted interim injunctive relief; see this Blog here.

Validity of the SPC is not an issue anymore, it has already been affirmed by the Supreme Court; see this Blog here.

The supplementary protection certificate C00915894 is at stake; see the official court information about the hearing. The basic patent is EP 0 915 894 B1; see EPO Register and Swissreg.

The dispute is all about whether or not the scope of an SPC that specifically refers to a unique salt form does extend to other salts. The SPC concerns tenofovir disoproxil fumarat + emtricitabin (emphasis added) .

Mepha’s attacked embodiment instead comprises tenofovir disoproxil phosphate.

Now, is that still ‘the product’ in the sense of Art. 140d PatA?

The parties agreed to disagree on this issue in the hearing. Gilead insisted that the ‘typical product definition’ has to be applied, in a sense that the fumarate is only to be understood as a ‘reference’ for the assessment of whether or not yet another salt form has the same pharmacological effect. If it had, then it should be considered ‘the same product’.

On the other hand, Mepha argued that the term ‘product’ is defined in Art. 140a(2) PatA, and it is to be construed within the context of the PatA; the Therapeutic Products Act (TPA) was not relevant in this respect. Thus, infringement has to be assessed as it is routinely done, i.e. deciding on whether there is literal infringment or infringement under the DoE. Mepha argued that the SPC is neither literally infringed, nor under the DoE.

The expert opinion of the judge-rapporteur held that the SPC was infringed, apparently essentially along the line of Gilead’s arguments. Still, in case the court followed the expert opinion, Mepha requested the court to provide a full assessment of infringement in the judgment, also including an assessment of literal infringement and infringement under the DoE. The Supreme Court would then be in a position to review the whole matter at once and in a timely manner, without the need to remit the case back to the FPC to carry out yet another assessment.

As mentioned above, Truvada® is a pharmaceutical for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. But Mepha recently obtained the market authorization of its Emtricitabin-Tenofovir-Mepha® in Switzerland also for PrEP – which is short for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis; see Swissmedic Journal 02/19. More information on PrEP can be found on Gilead’s website here. However, Gilead currrently has no MA for PrEP in Switzerland; Mepha’s MA is the only one in Switzerland for this indication.

PrEP likely is the reason why this case attracted quite some public attention. There has even been an organised Facebook event in St. Gallen; and flyer have been distributed, see here and here.

Groupe sida‘ activists

On a sidenote, when a member of the audience wore a shirt with one of these slogans on it, the presiding judge held that this was an attempt to influence the judges, and thus ordered him to either hide the slogan / change clothes; or to leave the court room.

The NZZ reported on the matter, as well as the ‘Tagesschau‘:

 
Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2017_023 | Hearing of 4 April 2019

Gilead Sciences Inc.
./.
Mepha Pharma AG

Panel of Judges:

  • Dr. Christoph GASSER
  • Dr. Tobias BREMI
  • Marco ZARDI

Judge-rapporteur:

  • Dr. Tobias BREMI

Court Clerk:

  • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

  • Dr. Simon HOLZER (MLL)
  • Dr. Andreas SCHÖLLHORN (LSP), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Defendant:

ANNOUNCEMENT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

SOME LIVE NOTES


BE ON THE KNOW

Enter your name and email address below to get notified of new posts by email.

Roses are red; violets are blue — It’s all obvious! Well, is that true?

Reading time: 5 minutes

Case Nos. O2016_010, O2016_011 | Hearing of 20 March 2019

Twice upon a time …

I have attended the main hearings in both these nullity cases, i.e. O2016_010 relating to EP 2 347 250 B1 (see EPO Register and Swissreg ) and O2016_011 relating to EP 2 352 018 B1 (see EPO Register and Swissreg). Note that EP’018 is based on a divisional application of EP’250.

The inventions are all about the capacitive testing of yarns or fabric, wherein the dielectric property of a capacitor arrangement is determined.

Patentability

It became clear from the pleadings that the defendant’s main request in both cases was that the patent be maintained in amended form only. In my understanding, the expert-opinion of the judge-rapporteur had held that the main request in O2016_010 / EP’250 was allowable, but not in O2016_011EP’018.

Novelty has not been an issue anymore, in both cases. Only obviousness, undue extension of subject-matter (interim generalisation) and clarity (of the additional feature) have been discussed. D2 (US 4,843,879; referred to in EP’250, ¶[0007]) was apparently agreed to be the closest prior art, and was combined in the assessment of obviousness with either D4 or D11 — both of which have unfortunately not been identified.

For me as a chemist, the highlight of the day was the plaintiff’s emotional release:

That’s not chemistry here; it’s physics!

The formulation of the ‘objective technical problem’ was quite a big deal in the hearing. This is what EP’250 says in ¶[0009] (emphasis added):

It is therefore the aim of the present invention to provide a method for the symmetry adjustment of a device for the capacitive examination of a moving elongated textile test sample which does not have the above disadvantages. The device should be simple, fast, cost-effective and, in particular, automatically adjustable.

Flower power, with roses in particular

Now, can automation be considered as the ‘objective technical problem’? In the plaintiff’s view, the ‘in particular’ is an emphasis of the aim of automation. The defendant disagreed: Automation was an add-on, and the other advantages could well be realised without automation. On the funny side, the following example has been used:

She likes flowers, in particular roses.

Now, imagine that the rose-loving woman visits a florist. Which flowers will she recognise first, amidst all the other flowers? The roses, of course!

Costs

Compensation of the ‘necessary expenses’ for the assisting patent attorney pursuant to Art. 3 lit. a and Art. 9(2) CostR-PatC was yet another point of discussion. The plaintiff requested reimbursement of about kCHF 45 for each case and argued, that the defendant triggered the additional costs because the amended claims had only been filed with the rejoinder which then had effectively restarted the whole discussion. I did not get the value in dispute, but the presiding judge indicated that kCHF 45 is about twice as much as the amount that would be awarded for legal respresentation, i.e. ‘according to the tariff’ that is based on the value in dispute.

Now, why is that important?

Since O2012_043, the FPC’s practice is that, as a rule, the ‘necessary expenses’ for the patent attorney may well be within the same order of magnitude of the costs for legal representation. But what about nullity cases? A patent attorney could do that on his/her own, without any legal representative; Art. 29(1) PatCA. Compensation would then be awarded according to the tariff for legal representatives; Art. 9(2) CostR-PatC.

The defendant questioned whether costs incurred for the assisting patent attorney are ‘necessary expenses’ at all, on top of the costs for legal representation according to the tariff, if he/she could have done the whole case on his own.

Use of the technical infrastructure in the court room

It is quite hard for the public to follow the arguments when the representatives just argue with acronyms and references. It’s sometimes frustrating, but I got used to it. But still, one of the basic ideas of a public hearing is to give the public the opportunity to follow the proceedings, isn’t it? But how would you even get a glimpse of what is really at stake when the parties only refer to ‘EP’111’ or ‘D1’ or ‘feature 1da’. That’s not information — it’s just noise.

I was very happy that the recent hearing in case S2018_006 was different (see this Blog here): Whenever someone referred to a specific document, the President put the same on the screen for it to be easily recognisable by the whole audience and the judges; projector and screen are fixedly installed in the ceiling anyway (see yellow arrow in the image below). Much appreciated!

Let there be information …

But that’s not only great for the audience; I strongly feel that it is also beneficial for representatives when arguing their case. When referring to a certain paragraph in a specific document in your pleadings, or a technical drawing, you always want to make sure that all the judges are on the same page, right? But how would you know that, with the judges sitting on a podium that even has an elevated front side that makes sure that nobody reveals a hand up there, behind the monitors. Yes, there are fixedly installed monitors (green arrows in the above image).

Now, did they all pick up the document that you are upon to discuss? You never know. So, why not actually use the monitors that each judge has in front of him/her, and the projector/screen for the audience, to make sure that everybody sees what you want to be seen? I could not think of any more powerful way to focus the discussion and thoughts on a specific argument.

Unfortunately, it didn’t work out that way in this hearing even though the defendant suggested it. I hope this was for technical reasons only, and does not indicate a general change of practice again.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case Nos. O2016_010, O2016_011 | Hearing of 20 March 2019

Gebr. Loepfe AG
./.
Uster Technologies AG

Panel of Judges:

  • Frank SCHNYDER
  • Dr. Tobias BREMI
  • Christoph MÜLLER

Judge-rapporteur:

  • n/a

Court Clerk:

  • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

  • Dr. Simon HOLZER (MLL)
  • Dr. Kurt SUTTER (Blum), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Defendant:

  • Dr. Andri HESS (Homburger)
  • Dr. Pavel PLISKA (inhouse)

O2016_010

Official announcement:

Fullscreen view (new tab)

Patent in suit:

Fullscreen view (new tab)

O2016_011

Official announcement:

Fullscreen view (new tab)

Patent in suit:

Fullscreen view (new tab)

SOME LIVE NOTES


BE ON THE KNOW

Enter your name and email address below to get notified of new posts by email.

Return of the non-return valves

Reading time: 2 minutes

Case No. O2018_013 | Hearing of 18 March 2019

There you go …

These proceedings are following-up on the case O2014_002 (discussed on this Blog here in more detail) where the FPC held that certain non-return valves for urinals produced by von Allmen AG were infringing EP 1 579 133 B1.

From what has been argued at the hearing, it appears that the defendant had obtained valves from a Swiss supplier (presumably Enswico AG; meanwhile liquidated) which in turn had obtained the valves from von Allmen AG. Thus, infringement was not an issue anymore.

Based on the information obtained in proceedings O2014_002, the plaintiff alleged that Aquis Systems had obtained 17’500 infringing valves. On the contrary, Acquis Systems argued that it had only obtained 4’700 valves in total, that those valves had been produced while a license agreement had still been in place and that it had believed in good faith that a license fee of CHF 1,85 per piece had been paid to Mr Dahm. Note that the patent had initially been granted to Mr Dahm, but has been assigned to the plaintiff Daspaco AG in 2013; see Swissreg.

Further, Aquis Systems argued that Daspaco had no standig to bring this suit, since it had not been the proprietor of the patent at the relevant time.

Meeting the goal …

The presiding judge pushed the parties to have settlement discussions, given the small amounts of money involved. And, indeed, both parties agreed.

Hopefully, the parties got this resolved.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2018_013 | Hearing of 18 March 2019

Daspaco AG
./.
Aquis Systems AG

Panel of Judges:

  • Dr. Christoph GASSER
  • Dr. Tobias BREMI
  • Dr. Ralph SCHLOSSER

Judge-rapporteur:

  • n/a

Court Clerk:

  • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

  • Cyrill RIEDER (FMP)
  • Kurt STOCKER (KHP), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Defendant:

  • Philip SCHNEIDER (SMS)

O2014_002
Partial decision of 21 November 2016

Fullscreen view (new tab)

ANNOUNCEMENT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

SOME LIVE NOTES


BE ON THE KNOW

Enter your name and email address below to get notified of new posts by email.

Silicon hairspring technology being litigated

Reading time: 5 minutes

Case No. S2018_006 | Hearing of 17 January 2019

CSEM logo

The plaintiff CSEM is the patentee of EP 1 422 436 B1; see Swissreg and the EPO register for further bibliographic details.

The problem at heart of the invention is the variability of resonance frequency with temperature: The frequency at which a spring oscillates depends on the elastic modulus of the material of which it is made, which in turn is temperature-dependent. The changes in frequency with temperature may not be huge, but if one is in the business of counting seconds (and watchmakers arguably are), this effect can become a problem. Just imagine that time flies faster while skiing than in a warm office!

Figures of EP'436
Figures of EP’436

EP’436 proposes a solution to this problem by coating the hairspring with a material that changes its elastic properties with temperature in the opposite direction of the base material. This can be best understood with the figures at hand. The hairspring is schematically illustrated in Fig. 1 (somehow reminding me of my favorite sweets when I was younger). Figures 2a and 2b illustrate the outer layer on the silicon core.

The relevant claim 1 in its version for Switzerland reads as follows:

A hairspring intended to equip the balance wheel of a mechanical timepiece and in the form of a spiraled rod (10) cut from an {001} single-crystal silicon plate having a first thermal coefficient (C1) and a second thermal coefficient (C2) of its spring constant C, the turns of said hairspring having a width w and a thickness t, characterized in that said rod comprises a silicon core (12) and an external layer (14) of thickness ξ formed around the silicon core and made of a material having a first thermal coefficient of the Young’s modulus of opposite sign to that of the silicon.

CSEM sued Cendres+Métaux Microtech AG and Cendres+Métaux SA for infringement of EP’436.

Note that the claim requires

a spiraled rod cut from a {001} single-crystal silicon plate […].

In our understanding, the allegedly infringing CMK1 movement features a hairspring that is cut from a differently oriented silicon plate.

CMMT‘s CMK1 movement
C+M logo

Still, CSEM alleges an infringement under the DoE and apparently argues that i) all crystal facet terminations would have the same effect (‘Gleichwirkung’); ii) a person skilled in the art would have identified other crystal facet terminations as having the same effect (‘Auffindbarkeit’); and iii) the person skilled in the art would have recognized different terminations as being solutions of equal value (‘Gleichwertigkeit’; see the discussion of the DoE questionnaire on this Blog here).

The defendant’s argument against infringement evolved around plaintiff’s citation of JPH06117476 in the description. Defendant argued that by way of the citation of JP’476 all three orientations had been disclosed to the skilled person. Thus, in the defendant’s view, limitation of the claim to just one specific crystal orientation excludes other orientations from the scope of the claim under the DoE.

As to the requested interim injunctive relief, it had been discussed when the plaintiff actually gained knowledge of the alleged infringement. Defendants apparently started marketing the CMK1 movement as early as 2015 and argued that plaintiffs had ample opportunity to recognize the alleged infringement, for example when the defendants presented the movement at a large exhibition. The plaintiff, on the other hand, argued that while it would have been theoretically possible to discover the alleged infringement earlier, he only actually gained knowledge of it in late 2018 and immediately sought legal remedy. According to the plaintiff, investigative measures to discover possible infringements (such as purchasing and analyzing competitors’ products) are not necessary in order to safeguard the right to interim injunctive relief.

Moreover, the plaintiff argued that only in 2018 the contested product went from a prototype stage to a commercially relevant product. In our understanding, the movement is used in Horage‘s Multiply series of watches:

Horage Multiply configurator (www.horage.eu, visited Jan 20, 2019)
Horage logo

It had been reported in Horological Times of August 2015 that the hairspring in this caliber is made from silicon.

Further, the defendants argued that CSEM as the licensor was not at risk of a not easily reparable harm, and that interim injunctive relief should not be granted for this reason, too. On the other hand, the plaintiff argued that CSEM is not only a licensor, but rather also a manufacturing entity.

Here it is!

Typically, it is quite hard for the public to follow the arguments when the representatives just argue with acronyms and references. Not so this time: Whenever anybody referred to a specific document, the President put the same on the screen so that it could be easily seen by the whole audience, incl. the interpreters. Much appreciated!

The oral proceedings closed with the President’s question whether the parties were interested in settlement talks. Both parties affirmed. The President, however, cooled down the enthusiasm and closed the hearing for lunch:

Wenn wir hier ernsthafte Vergleichsgespräche führen wollen, dann schaffen wir das nicht mehr vor dem Mittagessen!

(If we’re going to have serious settlement talks, we’re not going to be done before lunch!) It remains to be seen whether they could agree on an amicable solution or not.

Note that apparently this is not the first time that this patent is being litigated at the FPC. L’ AGEFI had reported already back in 2013 that an earlier dispute between CSEM (or the licensees Rolex, Swatch and Patek Philippe, hereinafter the consortium) and Sigatec (a joint-venture of Mimotec and Ulysse Nardin) had been settled, which settlement remained widely unnoticed, and the terms of the settlement agreement remained unavailable. Likewise, no details were disclosed in a technical review in 2017:

Screenshot from www.monochrome-watches.com (visited Jan 20, 2019)
Screenshot from www.monochrome-watches.com (visited Jan 20, 2019)

Reported by Philippe KNÜSEL and Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. S2018_006 | Hearing of 17 January 2019

CSEM Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique SA

./.

  1. Cendres+Métaux Microtech AG
  2. Cendres+Métaux SA

Panel of Judges:

  • Dr. Mark SCHWEIZER
  • Dr. Philipp RÜFENACHT
  • Dr. Lorenzo PARRINI

Judge-rapporteur:

  • Dr. Philipp RÜFENACHT

Court Clerk:

  • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

  • Dr. Andri HESS (Homburger)
  • Noëmi SCHÄR (Homburger)
  • Thierry RAVENEL (ICB), assisting in patent matters
  • Bernard MAYJONADE (Micheli), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Defendant:

  • Dr. Demian STAUBER (Rentsch Partner)
  • Fabio VERSOLATTO (Rentsch Partner)
  • Dr. Alfred KÖPF (Rentsch Partner), assisting in patent matters
  • Dr. Theodore CHOI (Rentsch Partner), assisting in patent matters

EP 1 422 436 B1

Fullscreen view (new tab)

ANNOUNCEMENT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

BE ON THE KNOW

Enter your name and email address below to get notified of new posts by email.

Go with the flow

Reading time: 3 minutes

Case No. O2016_009 | Hearing of 29 October 2018

iFlow sensor

Please find some background information about the subject-matter at stake on this Blog here.

In brief, Hamilton Medical AG alleges infringement of its Swiss patent CH 701 755 B1 (see Swissreg for further bibliographic details) by some of imtmedical AG‘s iFlow sensors. The only independent claim 1 of the patent as granted reads as follows:

Durchflussmessfühler (10) mit einem ein zylindrisches Gehäuse (10) definierenden Durchgang mit einer ersten Durchgangsöffnung (13) und einer zweiten Durchgangsöffnung (29); einem im Durchgang des Gehäuses angeordneten Strömungswiderstand (23), welcher das Gehäuse in einen ersten und einen zweiten Gehäuseteil (11 und 27) unterteilt; einer ersten Anschlussstelle (17) mit einer Verbindung zum Innern des ersten Gehäuseteils (11); und einer zweiten Anschlussstelle (19) mit einer Verbindung zum Innern des zweiten Gehäuseteils; dadurch gekennzeichnet, dass die ersten und zweiten Anschlussstellen (17, 19) in einem Abstand voneinander auf dem gleichen Gehäuseteil angeordnet sind.

Fig. 1 of CH 701 755 B1

The defendant denies an infringment, and argues for nullity as a plea in defense.

This case is already pending for two years. Likewise, the main hearing yesterday has been quite lengthy: Plaintiff’s initial pleadings took about 2.5 hours, and defendant’s reply took yet another two hours. The hearing was not even finished thereafter, but we just could not attend any longer. Anyway, some key aspects of the case became pretty clear from both parties’ first pleadings.

In our understanding, the expert opinion of the judge-rapporteur had held that the patent as granted was not valid. However, the judge-rapporteur apparently also held that the patent would be valid in a more limited extent, and that it would still be infringed to that extent. The plaintiff had invoked the patent to that limited extent in the second part of his reply, after the instructional hearing. Defendant firmly denied that this ‘verbal limitation’ (verbale Einschränkung) was admissible and argued that the case had to be dismissed if claim 1 of the patent as granted was invalid.

UPDATE 10 February 2019:

A previous version of this post noted that the patentee invoked the patent to a more limited extent only after receipt of the expert opinion of the judge-rapporteur. This was wrong. He did so already in the second part of his reply, after the instructional hearing. This has been corrected in the above.

Further, the defendant relied on i) a prior use; and ii) US 6,585,662 when arguing for lack of an inventive step.

Fig. 8 of US 6,585,662
Uphill fight

It remains to be seen how all this turns out, but from what has been argued at the hearing we conclude that it is currently an uphill fight for the defendant. And it did not seem as if this was a case to be concluded with a settlement. Stay tuned.

Reported by Tina VOCI and Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2016_009 | Hearing of 29 October 2018

Hamilton Medical AG
./.
imtmedical AG

Panel of Judges:

  • Dr. Mark SCHWEIZER
  • Dr. Tobias BREMI
  • Dr. Lorenzo PARRINI

Judge-rapporteur:

  • Dr. Tobias BREMI

Court Clerk:

  • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

  • Dr. Christoph GASSER (BianchiSchwald)
  • Renato BOLLHALDER (Bohest), assisting in patent matters
  • Dr. Torben MÜLLER (Bohest), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Defendant:

  • Dr. Rudolf RENTSCH (IPrime)
  • Ernst BREM (IPrime)
  • Paul ROSENICH (PPR)
  • Joachim KÜNSCH (PPR)

CH 701 755 B1

Fullscreen view (new tab)

ANNOUNCEMENT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

BE ON THE KNOW

Enter your name and email address below to get notified of new posts by email.

Laurastar and Innosteam Swiss working flat out

Case No. S2018_003 | Hearing of 28 June 2018

UPDATE 14 July 2018:

This post initially mentioned that the prohibition to dispose of the applications at stake has been lifted. We have learned meanwhile that this was unfortunately not correct. Rather, the register ban was maintained. The post has accordingly been corrected.

Laurastar logo

Laurastar and Innosteam are litigating about ownership of two PCT applications filed in the name of Innosteam; see the announcement of the hearing here. It is pretty clear that WO 2018/006994 A1 and WO 2018/036653 A1 are at stake; see the EPO Register here and here.

Innosteam logo

The patent applications are about devices and methods for producing instant steam (WO’994) and instant hot water (WO’653), for use e.g. in devices for ironing.

Plaintiff alleges that the two patent applications pertain to subject-matter that has been invented by two of its former employees that are now employed by the defendant. On the contrary, defendant argues that the claimed subject-matter had been invented when the inventors had no longer been employed by the plaintiff. In the hearing, the role of yet another former employee of Laurastar was briefly touched who apparently changed sides, too. He is not named as an inventor in the applications at stake, but from what the defendant has argued we understand that he apparently has referred his new employer to publicly available documents (inter alia patents / patent applications) of his former employer. Further clarification in this respect may well be subject of main proceedings which are pending.

On plaintiffs request, the President of the Court had ordered the defendant in a summary judgement of 20 April 2018 (unpublished) and without hearing the defendant beforehand not to dispose of the two patent applications while the main proceedings are pending.

The hearing was remarkable for some procedural reasons.

First, an exhaustive expert opinion of the judge-rapporteur in accordance with Art. 183(3) CPC has been given orally — for the first time ever, to the best of our knowledge. This expert opinion was not favorable for the plaintiff. The parties were then given the opportunity to comment on the expert opinion immediately thereafter.

Not yet done …

The parties were then asked for their interest in settlement discussions, but both parties denied.

Typically, this would have been it, and a decision on whether or not the interim measures are upheld would be issued in writing. Not so here. The President asked the second judge for his brief opinion, which was unfavorable for the plaintiff, too.

The prohibition for the defendant to dispose of the two patent applications while the main proceedings are pending has been upheld, for the time being.

Reported by Leila MÜLLER and Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. S2018_003 | Hearing of 28 June 2018

Laurastar SA
./.
Innosteam Swiss SA

Panel of Judges:

  • Dr. Mark SCHWEIZER
  • Dr. Ralph SCHLOSSER
  • Dr. Giovanni GERVASIO

Judge-rapporteur:

  • Dr. Giovanni GERVASIO

Court Clerk:

  • Agniezka TABERSKA

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

Representative(s) of Defendant:

  • Jacy PILLONEL (BCP)

ANNOUNCEMENT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

WO 2018/006994 A1

Fullscreen view (new tab)

WO 2018/036653 A1

Fullscreen view (new tab)


BE ON THE KNOW

Enter your name and email address below to get notified of new posts by email.

Hard materials, hard times …

Case No. O2016_001 ¦ Main Hearing of 3 May 2018

comadur.com

This case started off already on 27 February 2016, between Harcane and Comadur. There is not much known about the plaintiff, but the defendant is a company of the Swatch Group, specialising in hard materials. Noteworthy, the owner of Harcane, Rui Carolla, apparently had spent part of his career with Comadur; see SHAB.

Quite some background information was already included in the official announcement of the hearing. The plaintiff in first place requests that CH 707 572 B1, concerning a binder for an injection molding composition, be declared null and void. As an auxiliary measure, it is requested that the patent be assigned to the plaintiff. Allegedly, the patent lacks novelty over US 5,266,264, several PhD theses and the sale of a certain “feedstock” including the patented binder. The defendant had allegedly been provided with it back in November 2012. Further, the plaintiff alleges that the mixture according to CH 707 572 B1 had in fact been invented by Mr. Lestarquit, who was at the time an employee of the Plaintiff.

The defendant holds the view that the claimed subject-matter is new and inventive. All the compositions had been developed by Mr. Cartier, an employee of the defendant since 1999. The “mix sheets” developed by Mr. Cartier allegedly have only been put into practice by employees of the plaintiff, including Mr. Lestarquit. The defendant thus requests that the case should be dismissed in its entirety.

In the hearing, the alleged obviousness of CH 707 572 B1 was intensely discussed. Both parties had identified the characterizing part of claim 1 as the distinguishing feature, but proposed (opposing) problem-and-solution approaches (EPO Guidelines, G-VII, 5). The expert opinion of the judge-rapporteur had apparently been in favor of the plaintiff. Further, it was discussed whether the feedstock that had been exchanged between the parties during the collaboration had become public / is part of the prior art.

Initially, the defendant had no interest in settlement discussions, in view of some parallel proceedings elsewhere. Rather, the defendant requested that the present proceedings be stayed until after such parallel proceedings are concluded. Still, the defendant finally agreed to enter into settlement discussions as a first step.

Note that CH 707 572 B1 (filed 15 July 2013) has no further family members. However, we came across patent family WO 2014/191304 A1, claiming priority of CH 01021/13, filed 28 May 2013 and published as CH 708 097 A2, which is pretty similar to the patent in suit. It remains to be seen how all this will be sorted out.

Reported by Ingo LUMMER and Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2016_001 ¦ Main Hearing of 3 May 2018

Harcane Sàrl

./.

Comadur SA

Judges:

  • Dr. Mark SCHWEIZER
  • Dr. Tobias BREMI
  • Dr. Michael STÖRZBBACH
  • Dr. Regula RÜEDI
  • Dr. Thomas LEGLER

Judge-rapporteur:

  • Dr. Tobias BREMI

Court Clerk:

  • Agnieszka TABERSKA

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

  • Jean-Claude SCHWEIZER (SLB)

Representative(s) of Defendant:

  • Dr. Nathalie TISSOT (Tissot)

ANNOUNCEMENT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

PATENT IN SUIT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

BE ON THE KNOW

Enter your name and email address below to get notified of new posts by email.

Are rights re-established once and for all?

Case No. O2017_016 ¦ Main Hearing of 25 April 2018

Signpost

I have attended the hearing in this matter earlier today. Infringement of the Swiss SPC C00716606/01 concerning sevelamer is at stake; the basic patent is EP 0 716 606 B1 of Genzyme Corporation. Interim injunctive relief had been granted in earlier proceedings S2016_009; see this Blog here.

Notably, infringement per se is undisputed, as well as validity of the basic patent. However, the defendant (only) alleges that the SPC is invalid because the Office wrongfully granted re-establishment of rights (Art. 47 PatA) with respect to the time limit for filing the SPC application under Art. 140f PatA.

The parties had been summoned to the main hearing after a single exchange of briefs; plaintiff’s reply and defendant’s rejoinder were pleaded in the hearing. Since the only question at stake is a legal one, this worked out smoothly. It was also noted that no expert opinion of the judge-rapporteur will be established.

Now, can the SPC still be challenged for wrongful reinstatement in the present civil proceedings?

Undisputedly, wrongful reinstatement is not explicitly listed as a ground for nullity in Art. 140k PatA. However, the parties dissent on whether or not the list is exhaustive.

Defendant essentially argued that the Swiss legislator voluntarily aligned the Swiss law with the respective EU regulation, and that also further developments of the EU law need to be taken into account; BGE 129 III 135, ¶6. In the view of the defendant, the ECJ in all its decisions on SPCs essentially declared SPCs invalid whenever its grant had not been objectively justified — irrespective of whether or not the ground was explicitly listed in Art. 15 of Regulation (EC) 469/2009.

Plaintiff disagreed; the ECJ never introduced additional grounds of nullity but rather only interpreted the grounds that are explicitly mentioned. Further, the nullity grounds referred to in Art. 140k(1) lit a PatA explicitly only refer to Art. 146(1). However, the time limit for filing the SPC request is defined in Art. 146(2). The plaintiff noted that this focus only on paragraph 1 underlines the legislator’s intent to not include paragraph 2 into the list of grounds for nullity. Plaintiff further argued that any interested third party could well have appealed the decision of reinstatement (Art. 48 ff APA in the version of 09 December 2003), together with the decision of grant of the SPC – but the defendant failed to do so. See also the summary judgment in ¶3.5 in this respect. The decision on reinstatement is thus formally final, and the defendant has to live with it. Plaintiff further referred to BGE 90 I 186 (¶3) which held that re-establishment of rights according to Art. 47 PatA only concerns the relationship of the patentee to the Office; the effects on third parties are regulated exhaustively (sic!) by Article 48 PatA with the prior user right for bona fide third parties.

The later the day, the more pronounced the arguments: The parties reproached each other for having not been able to refer to a prior decision on precisely this issue to their favour. On the funny side, plaintiff noted that this is only because so far just no one has come up with this absurd idea.

So sad

The parties were then asked by the presiding judge whether they were interested in settlement discussions. Unfortunately, I cannot tell what the answer was because it was requested that the public be excluded before the question is answered, and this request was granted.

UPDATE 05 May 2018:

I meanwhile obtained the request and the grant of reinstatement.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2017_016 ¦ Main Hearing of 25 April 2018

  1. Genzyme Corporation
  2. Sanofi-Aventis (Suisse) SA

./.

Salmon Pharma GmbH

Composition of the Board of the FPC:

  • Dr. Ralph SCHLOSSER
  • Dr. Tobias BREMI
  • Prof. Dr. Daniel KRAUS
  • Dr. Andreas SCHÖLLHORN SAVARY
  • Dr. Stefan KOHLER

Court Clerk:

  • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Requester:

Representative(s) of Respondent:

  • Dr. Robert BRINER (CMS)

ANNOUNCEMENT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

BASIC PATENT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

BE ON THE KNOW

Enter your name and email address below to get notified of new posts by email.

An incredibly complex mechanical writing instrument not of this world

Case No. O2015_018 ¦ Main hearing of 13 March 2018

UPDATE 13 March 2018:

I have added some notes from the hearing below.

The FPC today published an announcement of the main hearing in this matter. The parties apparently have locked jaws about an invention relating to a mechanical writing instrument.

It started off with Guenat‘s request that Swiss Finest‘s CH 704 790 B1 be declared invalid; note that the patent has been limited in March 2017 and re-published as CH 704 790 C1, see Swissreg for further bibliographic details.

The plaintiff argued that the invention had been made by Frédéric Garinaud, an independent inventor who had applied for a European patent for this invention. The application has then been assigned to the plaintiff and a patent was granted; EP 2 479 648 B1, see Swissreg and European Patent Register for further bibliographic details.

Defendant countersued and requested that EP’648 be declared invalid, or assigned to the defendant. Interestingly, defendant argues that the invention had been made by Frédéric Garinaud when he had been working for the defendant. (Note, however, that Mr Garinaud is not mentioned as an inventor on CH’790.)

In addition, defendant requests injunctive relief for the product ‘Mechanical Fountain Pen RMS05‘.

Fountain Pen RMS05 by Richard Mille

This product has some amazing mechanics; see yourself:

Even more amazing is the price tag of $105,000 (as reported by Bloomberg and others).

The hearing will be in French language, and it will be a real ‘town hall’ meeting: The venue this time is not the Federal Administrative Court in St. Gallen, but rather the Hôtel de Ville de Neuchâtel.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2015_018 ¦ Main hearing of 13 March 2018

Guenat SA Montres Valgine ./.  Swiss Finest SA

CH 704 790 B1

Fullscreen view (new tab)

CH 704 790 C1

Fullscreen view (new tab)

EP 2 497 648 B1

Fullscreen view (new tab)

ANNOUNCEMENT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

NOTES FROM THE HEARING

BE ON THE KNOW

Enter your name and email address below to get notified of new posts by email.

Omega ./. Tudor et al.: The aftermath of Baselworld 2015

Case No. O2015_008 ¦ Main hearing of 30 January 2018

Omega logo

The main hearing in this matter took place earlier today.

See this Blog here for a brief review of the subject-matter at stake, based on the court’s detailed announcement of the hearing.

  1. Background of the case

Infringement of Omega‘s  EP 1 837 719 B1 is at stake; see EPO Register and Swissreg for further bibliographic details.

The single independent claim 1 reads as follows:

Balance for a timepiece movement including a felloe (3), arms (4) connecting the felloe (3) to the balance staff and inertia blocks (11) for adjusting the unbalance and regulating the moment of inertia, characterized in that the felloe (3) includes studs (7) directed inwards, a threaded hole (9) into which said inertia blocks (11) are screwed from the inside, passing through said felloe (3) and said studs (7).

This is best understood with Fig. 1 of the patent at hand:

Fig. 1 of the patent in suit

The attacked embodiments are Tudor‘s calibres MT5621 and MT5612; infringement under the Doctrine of Equivalents is alleged. The current versions of the calibres are shown below:

Interestingly, the balance wheels looked a little different when the calibre had been introduced back in 2015 at Baselworld; see here. Do you notice the different balance wheel in the top right of the calibre?

Former promotional material re Tudor’s calibre MT5621

We have found a perspective picture of the old MT5612 balance wheel on the internet here; a similar picture had been shown in the hearing.

When digging a bit deeper, we came across a report in a watch Blog suggesting that the change of the balance wheel had apparently been implemented in view of Omega’s intervention at Baselworld 2015. Indeed, that would be a perfect fit with the case number of the present matter referring back to 2015.

Tudor logo

Now, about three years later, the case surfaces again. Defendants Tudor and Detech deny infringement under the DoE and countersued for invalidity in view of DE 864 827US 759,914US 2,958,997, ROLEX calibres and the common general knowledge of the skilled person.

  1. Learnings from the hearing

Based on what  can be concluded from the pleadings, plaintiff is on the defensive. The expert opinion of the judge-rapporteur had apparently held that the claimed subject-matter (to the extent invoked) was novel, but not inventive. However, the judge-rapporteur had not yet assessed infringement in his expert opinion.

UPDATE Feb 1, 2018:

The first version of this post indicated that the expert opinion of the judge-rapporteur had already addressed infringement. I have been informed by plaintiff’s counsel that this is not the case. Accordingly, this has been corrected in the above. /MW

Most of the discussion was about fulfilment the feature

[…] inertia blocks (11) are screwed into a threaded hole (9) from the inside […].

Evidently, the parties disagree on whether or not this feature is fulfilled in the attacked embodiment(s). Is it sufficient for infringement to be ruled out if the inertia blocks are screwed into the threaded hole from the outside? It remains to bee seen whether fixation from the outside might constitute infringement under the DoE. In particular, plaintiff argued that there was no indication whatsoever in the patent in suit that the direction of fixation was of any relevance. Guess which way the wind is blowing: Pemetrexed.

The final judgment needs to be awaited, to fully understand how the inertia blocks in the attacked embodiments are actually fixed.

The value in dispute is CHF 1M. The parties did not enter into settlement discussions today.

Reported by Jolanda MINDER and Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2015_008 ¦ Main hearing of 30 January 2018

Omega S.A.

./.

  1. Montres Tudor S.A.
  2. Detech S.A.

Judge(s):

  • Dr. Mark SCHWEIZER
  • Dr. Tobias BREMI
  • Frank SCHNYDER
  • Dr. Philippe DUCOR
  • Christoph MÜLLER

Court Clerk:

  • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

Representative(s) of Defendants:

PATENT IN SUIT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

ANNOUNCEMENT

Fullscreen view (new tab)

BE ON THE KNOW

Enter your name and email address below to get notified of new posts by email.