Fulvestrant, again

Reading time: 4 minutes

Case No. O2017_014 | Decision of 10 March 2020 | ‘Fulvestrant use’

When you have read the report about the main hearing of 20 January 2020 on this Blog here, you probably won’t be overly surprised by the outcome: AZ’s complaint has been dismissed.

In brief, AstraZeneca asserted that EP(CH) 1 272 195 (see EPO Register and Swissreg for further information) is infringed by Sandoz’s generic version of AZ’s Faslodex®, i.e. Fulvestrant Sandoz 250 mg/5ml (Swissmedic approval no. 56778). The patent has been partially waived after closure of the file, in accordance with Art. 24 PatA (newly added features marked-up):

Additional features in claim 1, by way of a partial waiver

Here are my take-away messages from the decision:

Expert opinion

The decision clarifies in no uncertain terms the nature of the judge-rapporteur’s expert opinion (EO):

... is a legal assessment of the facts as pleaded before closure of the file.

Loose translation to English:

The [EO] is established after closure of the file, and it is the judge-rapporteur’s legal assessment of the facts put forward by the parties. It provides a contribution to the discussion for the purpose of rendering a judgment. The [EO] can therefore only deal with questions of law, but not with questions of fact. Accordingly, [an EO] cannot entitle the submission of new facts from the outset. Certainly, a party cannot use [the EO] as a trigger to remedy incomplete factual allegations.

Admissibility of partial waiver

Nosy? Me too. But it’s not yet time. Admissibility of the partial waiver after closure of the file is left undecided, in view of the appeal in case O2016_012 that is currently still pending at the Supreme Court. Irrespective of the answer to this highly interesting question, the complaint had to be dismissed for other reasons; see below.

Belated and insufficient factual allegations re infringement of the partially waived patent

A partial waiver after closure of the file per se cannot carry the day.

The decision holds that AZ’s pleadings re infringement of the partially waived patent — for the first time at the hearing — were belated and insufficiently substantiated:

... and insufficiently substantiated pleadings re infringement of the partially waived patent.

Accordingly, the complaint was dismissed.

How to (formally correctly) introduce a partially waived patent into the proceedings

AZ had submitted the partially waived patent to the court with letter of 8 August 2019, and Sandoz had been given the opportunity to comment thereon. The decision holds:

... and how it had been introduced into the proceedings.

Loose translation to English:

In this respect, it is not clear to the Court what the defendant means when asserting that the partially waived patent has not yet been asserted or formally correctly introduced into the proceedings.

Frankly, I am confused. My understanding from what had been pleaded at the hearing was that AZ had indeed submitted the partially waived patent — but merely as an annex, i.e. without asserting the substance of the partially waived patent in the submission itself. That could have been an interesting issue, somewhat similar to the situation that gave rise to the order of 3 May 2012 in O2012_022; see ¶¶ 10.4 et seqq. But, maybe, I just got it wrong. Anyway, that’s not the decisive issue here.

UPDATE 27 May 2020:

According to an update on the FPC’s website earlier today, the decision has not been appealed / is final.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2017_014 | Decision of 10 March 2020 | ‘Fulvestrant use’

AstraZeneca AB
./.
Sandoz Pharmaceuticals AG

Panel of Judges:

    • Prof. Dr. Daniel KRAUS
    • Prisca VON BALLMOOS
    • Marco ZARDI

Judge-rapporteur:

    • Prisca VON BALLMOOS

Court Clerk:

    • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

    • Dr. Michael RITSCHER (MLL)
    • Dr. Thorsten BAUSCH (Hoffmann Eitle), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Defendant / Patentee:

DECISION IN FULL

PATENT IN SUIT

EP 195 as granted by the EPO:

 

EP 195 after partial waiver in Switzerland:

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How many deaths can one die?

Reading time: 11 minutes

Case No. O2017_015 | Decision of 7 November 2019 | ‘Rame ferroviaire modulaire’

HEADNOTE

Art. 56 EPC, Art. 1(2) PatA: Inventive step and technical disadvantages in the event of a change in the teaching of the state of the art.

If an obvious technical disadvantage for the skilled person results from a change of the teaching of a prior art leading to the claimed invention, it cannot be asserted, that the skilled person would not seriously consider such a change of the teaching of the prior art, if at the same time the claimed invention does not remedy that disadvantage in an unexpected manner, but merely accepts it.

Alstom’s logo

The patent at stake in this infringement case is Alstom‘s EP 1 024 070 B1; see EPO Register and Swissreg for further bibliographic information. We have reported about the main hearing in this matter on this Blog here.

Alstom alleged that Bombardier‘s Twindexx train in the IR100 (SBB RABe 502) configuration infringes EP’070:

The IR100 configuration of Bombardier’s Twindexx train
SBB logo

Please find some further information about the Twindexx train on SBB’s website, and on Bombardier’s swissdosto.ch website and fact sheet. The video below is embedded from swissdosto.ch, for amusement of the railway enthusiasts out there before we are going to have a closer look at the more legal issues of the case …

Promo video, embedded from swissdosto.ch (Bombardier)

The relevant claims are the independent claim 1 and its dependent claim 7 (emphasis added), as asserted by Alstom:


Claim 1:

A modular railway rake formed of at least two vehicles (1, 2) with two superposed levels, including at least one bogie (10) including at least one driving axle, at least one bogie (11) including at least one carrying axle, and on-board equipment including at least one power supply electronic unit (19) for supplying motive power to one or more traction motors, at least one motive power supply unit (22, 25) for supplying power to the electronic unit (19), at least one auxiliary power supply unit (30) for supplying power to auxiliary equipment, and at least one device (21) for connection to an overhead power supply network, in which rake the motive power factor of a vehicle or a group of vehicles is defined as the ratio of the number of driving axles to the total number of axles of the vehicle or group, the rake being characterized in that at least one vehicle (1) includes at least one bogie (10) including at least one driving axle and at least one bogie (11) including at least one carrying axle, at least one bogie (11) of the rake including at least one carrying axle is associated with at least one of said on-board equipment items (19; 22, 25; 30; 21) disposed approximately over that bogie, and the ratio between the respective motive power factors of any two groups of two vehicles of the rake is not less than 1/3 and not more than 3.

Claim 7:

A railway rake according to claim 1, characterized in that at least one power supply unit (22, 25; 30) is disposed approximately over a bogie (11) including at least one carrying axle.
Bombardier Logo

Bombardier took the position that the IR100 did not make use of the features as marked-up in bold above; in particular, that the IR100 was not modular and did not have two superposed levels in the sense of EP’070.

Alstom had amended the request for injunctive relief after the instructional hearing in that the term ‘modular’ was replaced by the following:

What ‘modular’ means, in Alstom’s view

With regard to modularity, the court came to the conclusion that only a modularity could be meant which allows the train operator to react on momentary needs, by way of adding vehicles to preexisting train compositions. The decision refers to ¶¶[0002]-[0003] of the general specification of EP’070, as well as the explanations with respect to specific embodiments:

Alstom had argued that also modifications in medium and long term would be covered by the term ‘modular’ when properly construed. This, however, did not convince the judges because such broad reading would cover virtually any system composed of a plurality of parts. The term must necessarily have a (more narrow) meaning. Otherwise, so the decision, it would not have been used (¶19):

Par conséquent, étant donné que la rame ferroviaire est définie dans la revendication comme etant «modulaire», ce terme doit nécessairement avoir une signification particulière, sinon il n’aurauit pas été spécifié dans la revendication.

That’s pretty catchy, isn’t it? I would not be surprised if (mis?)use of this reasoning will become somewhat popular in response to an invalidity challenge:

Uuhu, hold on, the feature is in the claim, it must have a very specific meaning, else it wouldn’t be there.

Well, not necessarily. Sometimes there are features in a claim that are just trivial — and can be (easily) challenged as such.

Anyway, the decision holds that omission of the term ‘modular’ in the plaintiff’s request for injuctive relief as amended resulted in the court’s finding that the request went beyond the scope of protection of EP’070 and that it had to be rejected already for this reason alone; ¶21. Death #1.

This could have been it. However, the decision gives even more reasons as to why the complaint had to be rejected: EP’070 was neither valid nor infringed.

After a detailed claim construction, the decision holds that EP’070 to the invoked extent was novel over the closest prior art, D1, at least for the modularity of the rake and for the positioning of heavy elements approximatively above the carrying axle bogie.

Now … what is D1?!

But … what the heck is D1?

The decision is silent on what D1 is — which is regrettable. No chance to really review the stringency of the court’s line of arguments. It can only be assumed from what had been pleaded at the main hearing and some annotations in figures reproduced in the decision that D1 is a publication about the first generation DD-IRM (1994) train of the Dutch Railways (see Wikipedia: NS_VIRM).

Anyway, the decision holds that the subject-matter of EP’070 to the invoked extent did not involve an inventive step over the teachings of D1. The differentiating features (first, the modularity; and, second, the positioning of heavy elements approximatively above the carrying axle bogie) are associated with the technical effects that the weight is distributed evenly over the length of the train rake and that train operation becomes more profitable.

As to modularity, the decision holds that the skilled person would arrive at a modular train without further ado if he/she were to develop a more flexible and hence more profitable train rake.

With regard to the positioning of heavy equipment (such as the down chopper module in D1) the judges agreed with the patentee in that such heavy equipment would intuitively be placed in the lowest possible location of the rake, e.g. at the bottom of a low voltage machine room. However, and this is where the headnote stems from, if the claimed invention merely accepts an obvious disadvantage without suggesting any remedy thereto, the unfavorable feature cannot support the finding of an inventive step.

... when an apparent technical disadvantage of a technical solution is not overcome in a non-obvious manner but merely accepted.

In consequence, EP’070 was found obvious over D1 in combination with the skilled person’s general technical knowledge. Death #2.

At the face of it, the hn makes much sense against the background of the case at hand. But is the absolute character of the statement justified? One might well think of situations, where a particular disadvantage of a feature would be merely accepted (rather than remedied), but where the choice of the feature would still be non-obvious. For example, when the commonly known and persisting drawbacks are set off by other, unrelated or indirect advantages associated with the feature. In our perception, the hn should be understood with the provision marked-up below:

[…] if at the same time the claimed invention does not remedy that disadvantage in an unexpected manner, but merely accepts it and does not compensate for it by any unexpected technical advantage.

This would actually be perfectly in line with established case law of the Boards of Appeal of the EPO; see Case Law of the Boards of Appeal (2019), I.D.9.19.1, in particular T 119/82 (hn 2).

Again, the decision could have ended at this point. But the decision also expands on the question of infringement, i.e. that Bombardier’s Twindexx IR100 was not modular in the sense as described above. In particular, it could not, due to software issues, be supplemented with additional coaches nor could coaches be removed by the train operator in the short run. Also, no equivalent feature providing such flexibility could be found in the IR100 train. Death #3.

It is remarkable that the decision gives no less than three reasons for rejecting the request for injunctive relief. This is rarely seen. Still, it may well serve procedural economy: Both the parties and the appellate body are provided with a more complete picture of the first instance’s views. This way, the unsuccessful party can make a more informed decision on whether or not to lodge an appeal; and if an appeal is lodged, the appellate body might not have to remit the case back to the first instance — hence saving time and money.

Patent Reaper

But as if three reasons were not enough, death #4 was just around the corner: EP’070 lapsed after 20y in January 2020.

The decision has not been appealed / is final.

Reported by Jolanda MINDER and Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2017_015 | Decision of 7 November 2019 | ‘Rame ferroviaire modulaire’

Alstom Transport Technologies SASU
./.
Bombardier Transportation (Switzerland) AG

Panel of Judges:

    • Dr. Philippe DUCOR
    • Dr. Tobias BREMI
    • Christophe SAAM

Judge-rapporteur:

    • Dr. Tobias BREMI

Court Clerk:

    • Agnieszka TABERSKA

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

Representative(s) of Defendant:

DECISION IN FULL

PATENT IN SUIT

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How to interpret expressions stating a purpose in a patent claim

Reading time: 10 minutes

Case No. O2018_017 | Decision of 31 January 2020

Aschwanden’s logo

F.J. Aschwanden on the one hand, and acG Holding (Anita and Clément Gutzwiller) and Andreas (André) Robert on the other hand are litigating over validity of EP 2 475 827 in Switzerland. We had reported about the main hearing in this matter on this Blog here.

Basys’ logo

From the earlier case S2018_005 it is known that Basys is the exclusive licensee of EP 827; Aschwanden’s ‘Dura Box‘ line of products had been asserted to infringe EP 827.

EP 827 pertains to reinforcing elements that can be integrated in concrete structures in order to support recesses for conduits (water, electricity, etc.).

No suspension of proceedings / the judgment

Opposition proceedings are currently pending at the EPO, and the parties have been summoned for oral proceedings on 31 March 2020. One of the two opponents is F.J. Aschwanden, i.e. the plaintiff in the present case. The second opponent is Jordahl H-Bau AG. The latter has submitted the judgment to the EPO with letter of 18 February 2020.

The FPC may suspend proceedings, and in particular defer the judgment, where a final decision has not yet been taken in EPO opposition proceedings; Art. 128 lit. b PatA. The decision holds that the timeline is decisive. If a legally binding decision is to be expected soon by the EPO, it is justified in order to avoid contradictory decisions to suspend the national proceedings, or the judgment only. However, if it is likely to take longer for the EPO to reach a final decision, the constitutional right to an assessment within a reasonable period of time will prevail.

Defendant’s request to suspend proceedings had already been dismissed with order of 30 October 2019. The request at the main hearing to only suspend the judgment was unsuccessful, either. First, a delay of at least one year could hardly be considered acceptable for the plaintiff, in view of the constitutional acceleration requirement; Art. 29(1) FC, Art. 6(1) CPHR. Second, the decision holds that there is not even a risk of conflicting decisions since the claims for which the Opposition Division provisionally indicated allowability are not to be considered in the present proceedings; see below.

Belated claim amendment

The patentee / defendant had requested twice to maintain the patent in amended form: For the first time with the rejoinder, and for the second time in an even more limited form with the comment on the expert opinion of the judge-rapporteur. Clearly, the former was still timely filed, i.e. well before closure of the file. On the other hand, the latter was filed only after closure of the file. What is more, the patentee had submitted the very same claims in EPO opposition proceedings already well before the rejoinder was filed. The decision holds that the mere fact that the Opposition Division of the EPO indicated allowability of these claims (Auxiliary Request 2) with the summons to oral proceedings in no way justifies the belated submission of the claims in proceedings at the FPC.

On the merits

The decision extensively deals with claim construction on about five pages. Clearly, this facilitates the analysis of novelty and inventive step later on.

Neither claim 1 as granted nor claim 1 as amended with the rejoinder is held to be novel over Suzuki et al. (Nippon Steel Technical Report No. 96 July 2007: High Strength Deformed Bar-in-Coil «HDC800» for Shear Reinforcement of RC Beam with Web-opening) and JP 6-32280; an automated translation of the latter (which is actually not too bad) is available via the Global Dossier.


Claim 1 as granted (EN translation)

A Device for the reinforcement of concrete structures
B which, by means of inserted structural elements, bridges weakened zones
C which are produced by recessed parts
D and which transmits the forces
E wherein in addition to the conventional design of the reinforcement (11) originally calculated by the structural engineer
F and before the concrete is cast
G  the recessed parts are surrounded by at least one structural element
H the structural element (1) comprises at least one tension element (2) in the form of a straight tension rod, a bent rod or a frame
I which is connected at both ends to an anchoring
J at least one holder (4) is provided, which is connected to the tension element (2) or to the anchoring (3) or is formed by the tension element itself
K wherein a force model is formed by the structural element
L which reinforces the local shear behavior of the statics in the region of the recessed parts
M and thus improves the concrete structure weakened by the recessed parts by transferring the forces
N and reduces or eliminates the static weaknesses of the concrete structure caused by the recessed parts
O the tension element taking over shear, compression, transverse, tensile forces and / or bending moments
P wherein force-neutral zones are formed for the recessed parts by the force model
Q the structural element surrounds these force-neutral zones at least partly on two opposite sides
R and completely on a third side connecting the two sides
S the holder is arranged to hold the recessed parts in the force-neutral zone and the recessed parts are accommodated in the force-neutral zones

Claim 1 of the Auxiliary Request (EN translation), marked-up

A Device for the reinforcement of reinforced-concrete floorsstructures
B which, by means of inserted structural elements inserted into the reinforced-concrete floor, bridges weakened zones
C which are produced by recessed parts
D and which transmits the forces
E wherein in addition to the conventional design of the reinforcement (11) originally calculated by the structural engineer
F and before the concrete is cast
G  the recessed parts are surrounded by at least one structural element
H the structural element (1) comprises at least one tension element (2) in the form of a straight tension rod, a bent rod or a frame
I which is connected at both ends to an anchoring
J at least one holder (4) is provided, which is connected to the tension element (2) or to the anchoring (3) or is formed by the tension element itself
K wherein a force model is formed by the structural element
L which reinforces the local shear behavior of the statics in the region of the recessed parts
M and thus improves the concrete structure weakened by the recessed parts by transferring the forces
N and reduces or eliminates the static weaknesses of the concrete structure caused by the recessed parts
O the tension element taking over shear, compression, transverse, tensile forces and / or bending moments
P wherein force-neutral zones are formed for the recessed parts by the force model
Q the structural element surrounds these force-neutral zones at least partly on two opposite sides
R and completely on a third side connecting the two sides
S the holder is arranged to hold the recessed parts in the force-neutral zone and the recessed parts are accommodated in the force-neutral zones

The statements in the claim that indicate a purpose are the most crucial ones for the outcome of the case; see below.

Interpretation of expressions stating a purpose

The decision holds that according to the Supreme Court (122 III 81, r. 4b), in the case of a device claim (product claim), indications of purpose, effect or function do not normally have a restrictive effect on the scope of protection. Such statements generally are only to ease understanding. The situation is different if the disclosed use is not merely a statement of purpose, but already indicates the functional suitability of the device and its physical properties by way of explanation.

According to the practice at the EPO, on the other hand, the indication of a purpose in a device claim must in principle be interpreted such that the device is suitable for the specified purpose; see Guidelines F-IV, 4.13.1 and Case Law of the Boards of Appeal, 9th ed. (2019), I.C.8.1.5.

UPDATE 09 March 2020:

I only realized now that indications of a purpose had already been at stake in S2012_004 of 24 March 2012; see this Blog here. At that time, the FPC had applied the EPO’s approach without hesitation; see ¶8.

Anyway, the decision holds that the principles of interpretation of the Supreme Court and the EPO lead to same result: A known device prejudices the subject matter of a later claim if that known device was suitable for the purpose stated in the claim.

Even though it is a non-issue for the case at hand, I am still struggling with the reasons in 122 III 81, r. 4b.

Do you get it? I don’t.

In a claim directed to a «[d]evice for [doing x], wherein the device comprises [y and z]», how would I ever know whether the indicated purpose is only meant ‘to ease understanding’ («Verständnishilfe») or whether it defines ‘the functional suitability of the device and its physical properties by way of explanation’ («die funktionelle Eignung der Vorrichtung und deren körperliche Ausgestaltung erläuternd klarstellt»). Frankly, that doesn’t make much sense to me; it is the exact opposite of legal certainty. Anyway, the decision is almost a quarter of a century old. I would assume that the Swiss Supreme Court would nowadays assess the issue similar as the German Supreme Court did in the hn of Xa Zr 140 05 of 28 May 2009:

[Purpose features] regularly have the task of defining the subject-matter protected by the patent in such a way that it does not only have to fulfil the spatial-physical features recited in the claim, but that it must also be designed in such a way that it can be used for the purpose stated in the claim.

approaches 'purpose' features in pretty much the same way as the EPO.

Well, this is it. Period.

UPDATE 12 March 2020:

The decision has not been appealed / is final now.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2018_017 | Hearing of 18 November 2019

F.J. Aschwanden AG

./.

  1. acG Holding AG
  2. Andreas (gen. André) ROBERT

Panel of Judges:

    • Dr. Mark SCHWEIZER
    • Natalia CLERC
    • Dr. Kurt SUTTER

Judge-rapporteur:

    • Natalia CLERC

Court Clerk:

    • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

    • Christoph KÜNZI (CBK)
    • Tarik KAPIC (Bovard), assisting in patent matters
    • Beat SCHEUZGER (Bovard), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Defendant / Patentee:

    • Felix GRETHER (EBD)
    • Daniel MAIER (euromaier), assisting in patent matters

DECISION IN FULL

PATENT IN SUIT

EPO SUMMONS

EPO AUXILIARY REQUEST 2

RELATED CASE S2018_005


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Oxycodone / Naloxone II, III, … and counting(?)

Reading time: 7 minutes

Case No. O2017_009 | Decision of 7 November 2019 | ‘Oxycodon und Naloxon II und III’

The patents at stake in this nullity case are MundiPharma‘s EP 2 425 821 B1 (see EPO Register and Swissreg) and EP 2 425 824 B1 (see EPO Register and Swissreg). The same parties have already litigated over EP 2 425 825 B9 in separate proceedings O2016_016; see this Blog here — and so did yet another plaintiff in O2016_017; see this Blog here.

Wondering about the color code? It is adopted from the decision itself (¶ 16), to help getting the ducks (pardon me, divisional applications) in line:

Patents in suit: EP’821 and EP’824

Yet again, it’s all about a combination of oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride, in a weight ratio of 2:1.

This combination is an analgesic drug that is available as modified-release tablets under the trade name Targin® by MundiPharma.

Develco sought annulment of both EP(CH)’821 and EP(CH)’824 inter alia for undue extension of subject-matter, in violation of Art. 76 and Art. 123 EPC. Note that both patents had been filed as divisional applications, without any claims in first place. However, the claims of WO’520 had been recited in the specification in ¶ [0127] of EP 821 A1 and ¶ [0131] of EP 824 A1, respectively.

As to EP 824, the decision holds that claim 1 as granted does not comply with Art. 76 and Art. 123 EPC; see the following mark-up over the first claim-like clause  in ¶ [0131] of EP 824 A1:

EP 824 as granted; mark-up over ¶ [0131] of EP 824 A1
Likewise, the first auxiliary request (AR 1) — wherein only feature 1.7 had been amended over the claims as granted — failed  for essentially the same reasons:

AR 1, mark-up over the claims as granted

Both claim 1 as granted and claim 1 of the AR 1 had also been held by an Opposition Division of the EPO to not comply with Art. 123 EPC; see the decision of 11 September 2019, ¶¶ 2.4-2.9, 6 and 8.

Finally, also AR 2 failed for essentially (some of) the same reasons as the claims as granted, and in line with the ratio decidendi of the EPO’s Opposition Division:

AR 2, mark-up over the claims as granted

As to EP 821, the decision is pretty straight forward because the specification is the same as in EP 824. Claim 1 as granted does not comply with Art. 123 EPC:

EP 821 as granted; mark-up over ¶ [0127] of EP 821 A1
The FPC comes to the same conclusion for claim 1 of AR 1:

AR 1, mark-up over the claims as granted

This finding of the FPC is in line with the decision of an Opposition Division in parallel proceedings at the EPO; see the decision of 11 September 2019 (AR 1 corresponds to AR IX in EPO opposition proceedings).

On the merits, I feel that this case is nothing out of the ordinary in terms of assessment of undue extension of subject-matter. Still, there are two statements that I find noteworthy.

First, the decision holds in ¶ 25 that, as a rule, when reading a patent application or a patent, the person skilled in the art assumes that features, if they are expressly mentioned in an independent claim, are important and not just superfluous — unless there are clear indications to the contrary. Thus, for a feature to be omitted, it is therefore not sufficient to show that it is not highlighted anywhere as important. Rather, it must be shown that the skilled person recognizes that the feature does not make a technical contribution or can be omitted. It must therefore be established that the skilled person, using common general knowledge, would regard the claimed subject-matter even without the specific feature  as — explicitly or implicitly — directly and unambiguously disclosed in the application as filed.

Grundsätzlich geht der Fachmann beim Lesen einer Patentanmeldung oder einer Patentschrift a priori zunächst einmal davon aus, dass Merkmale, wenn sie ausdrücklich in unabhängigen Patentansprüchen genannt werden, auch wichtig und nicht einfach überflüssig sind, sofern es nicht klare Hinweise für das Gegenteil gibt.

Damit ein Merkmal weggelassen werden kann, genügt es also nicht, zu zeigen, dass es nirgends als wichtig hervorgehoben wird, sondern es muss gezeigt werden, dass für den Fachmann zweifelsfrei erkennbar ist, dass das Merkmal keinen technischen Beitrag leistet oder auch weggelassen werden kann. Mithin muss gezeigt werden, dass der Fachmann unter Heranziehung des allgemeinen Fachwissens den beanspruchten Gegenstand auch ohne das Merkmal als – explizit oder implizit – unmittelbar und eindeutig in der ursprünglichen Fassung der Anmeldung offenbart ansehen würde.

In my perception, this is essentially the approach of the EPO, even though the decision does not make any reference to the EPO Guidelines or case-law of the Boards of Appeal in this respect.

Second, the decision makes a clear distinction in ¶ 44, with extensive reference to case-law of the Boards of Appeal, between mere deletion of some elements from lists of a certain length on the one hand (which may well be admissible), and so-called singling out of specific elements from a lists (which is typically not permissible).

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2017_009 | Decision of 7 November 2019 | ‘Oxycodon und Naloxon II und III’

Develco Pharma Schweiz AG
./.
MundiPharma Medical Company

Panel of Judges:

    • Dr. Daniel M. ALDER
    • Dr. Tobias BREMI
    • Dr. Hannes SPILLMANN

Judge-rapporteur:

    • Dr. Tobias BREMI

Court Clerk:

    • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Develco:

    • Andrea MONDINI (TIMES)
    • Dr. Cornelia HOFFMANN (SBMP), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Mundipharma:

    • Dr. Simon HOLZER (MLL)
    • Renato BUCHER (MLL)
    • Dr. Dirk BÜHLER (Maiwald), assisting in patent matters
    • Dr. Andreas LEDL (Maiwald), assisting in patent matters

DECISION IN FULL

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The Supreme Court will not have its say on O2018_009 re Fulvestrant

Case No. 4A_332/2019 (Supreme Court) | Order of 13 November 2019, on appeal against O2018_009  (FPC) | Decision of 27 May 2019 | ‘Patentnichtigkeit Fulvestrant’

Reading time: 3 minutes

A quick recap: Actavis had challenged validity of AZ’s Swiss part of EP 2 266 573 back in 2015, and the FPC had indeed held in 2017 that EP 573 was invalid for lack of inventive step; see this Blog here. However, the Supreme Court overruled that decision and remitted the case back to the FPC for re-assessment of obviousness; see this Blog here. In the second round, the FPC held that the subject-matter of EP 573 did involve an iventive step; see the decision O2018_009 of 27 May 2019. In brief, the FPC held that neither

rendered the claimed subject-matter obvious. That decision was again appealed to the Supreme Court, and I have been eagerly awaiting a good read. But nothing like that. The Supreme Court only published a dismissal order. The parties have apparently reached an amicable settlement; court fees are shared.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. 4A_332/2019 (Supreme Court) | Order of 13 November 2019, on appeal against O2018_009  (FPC) | Decision of 27 May 2019 | ‘Patentnichtigkeit Fulvestrant’

Mepha Schweiz AG
(formerly Actavis Switzerland AG)
(Appellant / Plaintiff)
./.
AstraZeneca AB (Respondent / Defendant)

Single Judge:

    • Dr. Kathrin KLETT

Court Clerk:

    •  Dr. Thomas WIDMER

Representative(s) of Appellant / Plaintiff:

Representative(s) of Respondent / Defendant:

    • Dr. Michael RITSCHER (MLL)
    • Dr. Kilian SCHÄRLI (MLL)

SUPREME COURT DECISION

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FPC DECISION

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EP 2 266 573 B1

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Lilly’s EP 1 313 508 on combination of pemetrexed and vitamin B12 held valid

Case No. O2018_003 | Decision of 15 October 2019 | “Patentnichtigkeit; Pemetrexed”

The patent in suit is Lilly‘s EP 1 313 508 B1; see the EPO Register and Swissreg for further details. In a nutshell, EP’508 relates to combination of pemetrexed disodium and vitamin B12. See this Blog here for a discussion about earlier infringement proceedings concerning the same patent.

Now, nullity is at stake.

An Opposition Division of the EPO had maintained the patent as granted with decision of 27 December 2010; an appeal had initially been lodged but withdrawn later. Related decisions in civil proceedings elsewhere had also addressed the validity of EP’508, e.g. in

Thus, it was an uphill fight for the plaintiff. And even though the FPC took the parallel decision of the German FPC into account, it explicitly disagreed. It is held on p 19 (penultimate and lastparagraph), that the German FPC erred with the finding that

[…] bei einer Pemetrexedgabe durch die Blockierung der drei Schlüsselenzyme Thymidylatsynthase (= TS), Dihydrofolatreduktase (= DHFR) und Glycinamidribonukleotidformyltransferase (= GARFT) im «DNA- Zyklus» nicht nur dieser Zyklus, sondern auch der «Methylierungszyklus» blockiert wird.

Consequently, the FPC did not put much weight (if any) on the parallel decision in Germany.

On the contrary, the decision holds that the claimed subject-matter was novel over Worzalla et al. since mere reference to a diet ‘Purina Chow #5001’ did not implicitly, yet clearly and unambiguously, disclose the presence of vitamin B12 (or folic acid).

Further, the decision rejects plaintiff’s argument re obviousness over Niyikiza et al. (abstract 609P bridging pages 126/127), Niyikiza et al. (abstract 2139 on the top right, referred to as act. 7_10 in the decision), the IBIS Guide to Drug-Herb and Drug Nutrient Interactions, Jackman and Calvert (which had been considered as closest prior art in EPO opposition proceedings).

The decision has been appealed to the Supreme Court.

A discussion of this decision is also available on the EPLAW Blog, provided by defendant’s counsel.

UPDATE 18 June 2020:

The Supreme Court has dismissed Sandoz’s appeal with decision of 1 May 2020 (published 17 June 2020); the full judgment is available here.

The operative part of the judgment has been published earlier by Lilly’s counsel on EPLaw Blog; available here.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2018_003 | Decision of 15 October 2019 | “Patentnichtigkeit; Pemetrexed”

Sandoz Pharmaceuticals AG

./.

Eli Lilly & Company

Panel of Judges:

    • Dr. Daniel ALDER
      • Dr. Roland DUX
      • Marco ZARDI

Court Clerk:

    •  Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

    • Dr. Markus WANG (Bär & Karrer)
    • Christoph FRAEFEL (SBMP), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Defendant:

DECISION IN FULL

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Non-official English translation (first published on the EPLAW Blog):

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PATENT IN SUIT

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Low dosage form of tadalafil held obvious, preliminary injunction denied

Reading time: 13 minutes

Case No. S2019_007 | Decision of 1 October 2019

DISCLOSURE NOTICE

Hepp Wenger Ryffel is involved in this case on behalf of the defendant.

The patent in suit is CH/EP 1 173 181 H1, after partial surrender of EP 1 173 181 B3 which itself came out of central limitation proceedings concerning EP 1 173 181 B1 before the EPO; see EPO Register and Swissreg for further information.

EP’181 is meant to protect Lilly‘s low dosage forms of tadalafil, i.e. Cialis® 2.5 mg and Cialis® 5 mg, for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Cialis at these low dosages is sometimes referred to as the ‘weekend pill’ because it can not only be taken on demand but also once daily, without regard to timing of sexual activity. See drugs.com and Lilly’s prescribing information.

Lilly sought for a preliminary injunction against Sandoz‘s generics Tadalafil Sandoz® 2.5 mg and Tadalafil Sandoz® 5 mg.

The feature analysis of claim 1 of CH/EP’181 H1 reads as follows:

1.1 Pharmaceutical unit dosage composition
1.2 comprising a compound having the structural formula [tadalafil]
1.3 comprising 1 to 5 mg of this compound
1.4 said unit dosage form suitable for oral administration
1.5 up to a maximum total dose of 5 mg per day
1.6 for use in treating a condition where inhibition of PDE5 is desirable
1.7 wherein the condition is sexual dysfunction.

No dosage regime

Note that the claim does not address the frequency of taking of tadalafil. In accordance with feature 1.5, tadalafil could be taken once or several times per day (prophylactic or on demand, as long as the dose of 5 mg per day is not exceeded), and it is not defined that tadalafil is taken each day. Similar to the German FPC (¶ II.1), the decision holds that the claim lacks an essential element of a dosage regime, i.e. the frequency of taking tadalafil.

Claim to priority presumably valid

EP’181 is based on a national phase application of WO 00/66099 and claims priority of US 60/312,036.

The decision holds that the claim to priority is presumably valid, both formally (¶ 19) and on the merits (¶¶ 20-22).

Presumably no undue extension of subject-matter

The range of ‘1 to 20 mg’ in EP’181 B1 — with ‘5 to 20 mg’ being preferred — had been limited to ‘1 to 5 mg’ in EP’181 B3.

The decision holds that the plea in defense with respect to an undue extension of subject-matter is presumably unfounded (¶¶ 23-24), because the skilled person would still have seriously contemplated the range of 1 to 5 mg in view of dependent claim 4 (2.5 mg) and example 7 (2 mg).

Novelty acknowleged …

Since the priority claim was held presumably valid, the only remaining document to be considered with respect to novelty was WO 97/03675 A1 (Daugan). The relevant disclosure therein reads as follows (p 5, l 1-11):

For administration to man in the curative or prophylactic treatment of the disorders identified above, oral dosages of [tadalafil] will generally be in the range of from 0.5-800 mg daily for an average adult patient (70kg). Thus for a typical adult patient, individual tablets or capsules contain from 0.2 – 400 mg of active compound, in a suitable pharmaceutically acceptable vehicle or carrier, for administration in single or multiple doses, once or several times per day. […] In practice the physician will determine the actual dosing regimen which will be most suitable for an individual patient and it will wary with the age, weight and response of the particular patient.

Specific examples in Daugan make use of 50 mg of active compound in a tablet (p 12 ff).

Now, is the range of 1-5 mg novel over the broad range disclosed in Daugan?

According to the EPO Guidelines (G-VI, 8, ed. 2018), a sub-range selected from a broader numerical range of the prior art is considered novel, if each of the following three criteria is satisfied (emphasis added):

    1. the selected sub-range is narrow compared to the known range;
    2. the selected sub-range is sufficiently far removed from any specific examples disclosed in the prior art and from the end-points of the known range;
    3. the selected range is not an arbitrary specimen of the prior art, i.e. not a mere embodiment of the prior art, but another invention (purposive selection, new technical teaching).

The decision only applies criteria a. and b. for novelty, while the requirement of a purposive selection / new technical teaching (c.) is said to be related to obviousness only. Note that this criterion is also abolished with in the 2019 edition of the EPO Guidelines, entering into force on 1 November 2019.

Clearly, 1-5 mg is a narrow range compared to 0.2 – 800 mg; criterion a. is thus fulfilled.

But is the range sufficiently removed from the working example of 50 mg in Daugan? The decision holds that even though the absolute difference is only 45 mg, the absolute amounts still differ by a factor of 10. Thus, criterion b. is also considered fulfilled.

On a personal note, I doubt that time was already ripe for changing the Guidelines. The recent 2019 edition of the book ‘Case Law of the Boards of Appeal’ in chapter I.C.6.3.1 correctly holds that there are several decsions that disregard criterion c., but still there are even recent decisions that do apply criterion c. There have been constant rumors for quite a while that this might be sth for the EBoA to finally decide. I would have preferred to await final clarification on BoA level over the uncertainty of an early change in first instance proceedings that might perhaps need to be reversed again in a worst-case scenario. In my view, criterion c. when correctly applied is a test whether there is a ‘new technical teaching’ (not just a formally new numerical value); see emphasis above. I cannot see any fundamental misconception in doing so under the title of novelty. A new technical teaching must not be confused with a non-obvious technical teaching. But be this as it may, I am still hopeful that the EBoA might finally have its say.

… but the low dosage form is obvious

Actually, obviousness is at the heart of this multi-national dispute. Lilly argued that courts in strict application of the problem-solution approach had found that EP’181 B3 was valid (e.g. in DK and FI), whereas only courts that applied a somewhat different approach concluded that EP’181 B3 was invalid (e.g. in the U.K., DE and NL):

Accordingly, Lilly pushed for a strict application of the problem-solution approach in the present proceedings. The FPC indeed applied the problem-solution approach, but still concluded that EP’181 H1 was invalid.

The parties agreed on WO 97/03675 A1 (Daugan) as the closest prior art.

It’s no more than a sideshow for the outcome of the decision, but an interesting one:

The decision holds in ¶ 33 that the skilled person would understand the broad ranges in Daugan as ‘boiler plates’ which are aimed at claiming the broadest possible protection. This implies quite some knowledge of a patent practitioner. The discussion of the broad ranges is in the specification, not in the claims. What is more, the skilled person is defined earlier in the decision as follows (¶ 14):

[A] team consisting of a clinical pharmacologist (with knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of conventional medicines and biological preparations) and a clinician (with knowledge of urology, and in particular of sexual dysfunctions or erectile dysfunctions and available medicinal treatments such as sildenafil).

I wonder where any knowledge of a patent practitioner stems from in this team. When discussing patent literature in litigation, it is constantly assumed that the ‘skilled person’ just knows how to read patents, and that he is even able to understand what the drafting attorney might have had in mind and intended in legal terms when drafting the specification. This is anything but realistic, in my perception. On the contrary, the typical pharmacologist and clinician will be used to read scientific publications, and without any additional training in patent matters he will approach a patent document just like any other piece of scientific literature.

In view of WO 97/03675 A1 (Daugan) as closest prior art, the FPC defined the objective technical problem as to provide a clinically effective and safe dosage of tadalafil for the treatment of sexual dysfunction.

The decision holds that it is credible that the skilled person would always aim to find the lowest possible effective dosage of an active substance, for various reasons. First, because the skilled person knows that a lower dosage will have fewer side effects, and the avoidance of side effects is always a goal in drug research. Second, the skilled person will strive to find the lowest possible effective dosage, because it may well be that the regulatory authority asks for it. Although it is not certain that the approval authority will require this information, it is still reasonably possible. Even this possibility is a sufficient incentive to identify the lowest possible dosage: If the necessary studies would only be done at the request of the authority later on, the market authorisation would be considerably delayed.

Interestingly, the decision also expands on the ‘reasonable expectation of success’ (see this Blog here) — and its irrelevance for the case at hand. A ‘reasonable expectation of success’ is not necessary if the skilled person has an incentive for any other reason (e.g. a potential inquiry from the approval authority to specify the lowest effective dosage in the present case). The skilled person will then just take the necessary steps towards the invention unless he has to assume that this is hopeless right from the outset (¶36):

[E]ine Erfindung [ist] naheliegend, wenn der Stand der Technik […] dem Fachmann einen Anlass (“Motivation”) bietet, den nächstliegenden Stand der Technik so abzuwandeln, dass er zum beanspruchten Gegenstand gelangt. Oft wird den Fachmann eine begründete Erfolgserwartung zu der Weiterentwicklung veranlassen, d.h. wenn er aufgrund wissenschaftlicher Erwägungen annimmt, dass die Abwandung des Standes der Technik mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit zur Lösung der Aufgabe führt, wird er diese Abwandlung naheliegenderweise vornehmen. Eine begründete Erfolgserwartung in diesem Sinne ist aber nicht notwendig, wenn der Fachmann bereits aus anderen Gründen einen Anlass hat, den nächstliegenden Stand der Technik zum Gegenstand des geltend gemachten Anspruchs weiterzuentwickeln. Er wird diese Entwicklung dann vornehmen, wenn er nicht geradezu annehmen muss, dass sie aussichtslos ist.

The decision holds that the skilled person would  have routinely included a dose of 5 mg of tadalafil in the phase IIb clinical study to determine the dose-response curve, in particular in view of Goldstein et al. (1997) where quite some efficacy of the sildenafil, the first-in-class drug, had been reported for a dosage of as low as 5 mg.

Excerpt from Goldstein et al. (1997)

The skilled person would then inevitably have realised that tadalafil at a dose of 5 mg was still clinically effective. Thus, the decision holds that the subject-matter of EP’181 H1 was prima facie obvious.

  • The decision can still be appealed to the Supreme Court.

Reported by Martin WILMING

The ‘two bathtubs’ header image is a screenshot taken from one of Lilly’s Cialis® commercials at about 0:40 min.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. S2019_007 | Decision of 1 October 2019

(1) ICOS Corporation
(2) Eli Lilly (Suisse) SA
./.
Sandoz Pharmaceuticals AG

Panel of Judges:

    • Dr. Mark SCHWEIZER
    • Dr. Martin SPERRLE
    • Marco ZARDI

Court Clerk:

    • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of ICOS / Eli Lilly:

    • Dr. Christian HILTI (Rentsch)
    • Dr. Demian STAUBER (Rentsch)
    • Dr. Andrea CARREIRA (Rentsch), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Sandoz:

DECISION IN FULL

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PATENT IN SUIT

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The public may be excluded from settlement discussions — but maybe not from the instruction hearing in general?

Reading time: 3 minutes

As discussed a while ago on this Blog here, the settlement discussion at the occasion of a main hearing is non-public at the FPC. I trust that this will not change any time soon, in view of a decision of the Supreme Court that has been published earlier this week (4A_179/2019 of 24 September 2019). In that case, an accredited court reporter of the Republik had been asked to leave the room for the settlement discussion at the end of a main hearing in proceedings at the Zurich labor court. Ultimately, the Supreme Court has now endorsed this exclusion of the public from the settlement discussion:

Die Bemühungen des Gerichts, zwischen den Parteien zu vermitteln, gelten nicht als Gerichtsverhandlung respektive Verhandlung und unterstehen nicht dem Grundsatz der Justizöffentlichkeit.

Now, what about instruction hearings according to Art. 226(2) CPC?

Maybe, the Supreme Court telegraphed a message by explicitly saying nothing (emphasis added):

Demgegenüber ist hier nicht zu beurteilen, ob es zulässig wäre, die Öffentlichkeit über die Vergleichsgespräche hinaus generell von Instruktionsverhandlungen auszuschliessen, zumal an solchen nach Art. 226 Abs. 2 ZPO unter anderem auch der Sachverhalt ergänzt und die Hauptverhandlung vorbereitet werden kann ([…]).

In English (emphasis added):

On the other hand, it is not necessary here to assess whether it would be permissible to generally exclude the public from instruction hearings beyond the settlement discussions, especially since, according to Art. 226 para. 2 CPC, the facts of the case can be supplemented and the main hearing can be prepared in the instruction hearings ([…]).

The FPC took note. Here is the FPC’s tweet of earlier today:

Indeed, the Supreme Court did leave it undecided whether the public could also be excluded from the formal part of an instruction hearing. Still, the Supreme Court made it crystal clear that it does not want to see its judgement being read on instruction hearings in general, in view of what is (or maybe) going on in (the formal part of) an instruction hearing — contrary to mere settlement discussions, be it during a main hearing or an instruction hearing.

In my perception, that’s a somewhat deafening silence on this issue, isn’t it?

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. 4A_179/2019 (Supreme Court) |  Decision of 24 September 2019, on appeal against RA190002-O/U (High Court, Zurich) | Decision of 6 March 2019 (unpublished)

[accredited court reporter, Republik] (Appellant)
./.
Labour Court, Zurich (Respondent)

Panel of Judges:

    • Dr. Christina KISS
      • Dr. Kathrin KLETT
      • Dr. Fabienne HOHL
      • Dr. Martha NIQUILLE
      • Marie-Chantal MAY CANELLAS

Court Clerk:

    •  Dr. Christian KÖLZ

Representative(s) of Appellant:

    • Marin FARNER (FWE)

Representative of Respondent:

    • n/a

SUPREME COURT DECISION

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PI request against Edwards’ TMVr device PASCAL granted based on EP’850

Reading time: 5 minutes

Case No. S2019_002 | Decision of 15 August 2019 | ‘PASCAL’

DISCLOSURE NOTICE

Hepp Wenger Ryffel is involved in this case on behalf of the plaintiffs.

This infringement case is about EP 1 624 810 B1 and EP 1 408 850 B1; see EPO Register (here and here) and Swissreg (here and here) for further bibliographic information. Plaintiffs (Abbott et al.) asserted that defendants  (Edwards et al.) are infringing the Swiss parts of EP’810 and EP’850 with their PASCAL Transcatheter Mitral Valve repair (TMVr) device.

See Edward’s PASCAL website for further information on this product.

For comparison, plaintiffs’ own product is MitraClip:

See Abbott’s MitraClip website for further information on this product.

The main hearing had taken place on 3 July 2019.

The decision holds that PASCAL infringes claim 1 of EP’850 (¶¶ 62-70), and that this claim is valid over the prior art referred to by defendants as a plea in defense, i.e. US 3,874,388 (E5), WO 96/32882 A1 (E6) and CN 1 142 351 A (E7); ¶¶ 48-61. Preliminary injunctive relief was thus granted, based on EP’850.

As to EP’810, the decision holds that claim 1 is not infringed; ¶¶ 31-34.

Not easily reparable harm

Defendants contested that MitraClip itself is covered by the patents in suit; plaintiffs disagreed. The decision holds that this is irrelevant in any event. The irreparable harm of plaintiffs 1 and 3 depends on whether their own product is competing, since experience has shown that this leads to a loss of turnover, the extent of which is difficult to prove. Mere reference to potential financial compensation does not eliminate the irreparable harm; ¶ 77.

Proportionality

Precautionary measures must be proportionate in the sense that the content of the ordered measure must be suitable to avert the asserted disadvantage and must not go further than is absolutely necessary to avert the disadvantage (‘proportionality in the narrower sense’). Whether the adoption of precautionary measures may also be made dependent on the fact that the precautionary measure applied for does not encroach disproportionately heavily on the legal sphere of the defendant (‘proportionality in the broader sense’) is controversial.

In the present case, the FPC could leave this issue undecided because the defendants did not claim that the precautionary measure applied for has a disproportionate impact on their legal sphere, but that it is in the public interest that the marketing of the PASCAL device in Switzerland should not be prohibited as a precautionary measure.

The decision holds that — while it is controversial whether the adoption of a precautionary measure can be refused if it disproportionately affects the interests of the defendant — it is clear that public interests are not to be taken into account when it comes to weighing of interests: The PatA provides for a system of compulsory licences which, in principle, closes the gap in order to protect public interests from being jeopardised by the enforcement of patents. In particular, Art. 40 PatA provides for a compulsory licence in the public interest. In passing, the decision notes that it has not yet been decided in Switzerland whether the claim to a compulsory license can also be invoked in summary proceedings. Note that this has been answered in the affirmative in Germany recently; BGH X ZB 2/17 — Raltegravir.

Anyway, defendants did not claim that they should be granted a compulsory license in order to protect public interests. In particular, defendants had not submitted a license offer to the patentee at reasonable market conditions which the patentee has not accepted within a reasonable period (cf. Art. 40 in conjunction with Art. 40e (1) PatA). Accordingly, the objection that the requested measures were disproportionate has been rejected.

These considerations in ¶¶ 80-82 are what the FPC referred to in the following Tweet:

An appeal is currently pending at the Supreme Court.

UPDATE 7 May 2020:

The appeal has been dismissed; the Supreme Court decision 4A_453/2019 has been published earlier today.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. S2019_002 | Decision of 15 August 2019 | ‘PASCAL’

(1) Evalve, Inc.
(2) Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.
(3) Abbott Medical (Schweiz) AG
./.
(1) Edwards Lifesciences AG
(2) Edwards Lifesciences Technology Sàrl
(3) Edwards Lifesciences IPRM AG
(4) Mitral Valve Technologies Sàrl

Panel of Judges:

    • Dr. Mark SCHWEIZER
    • André ROLAND
    • Dr. Michael STÖRZBACH

Judge-rapporteur:

    • André ROLAND

Court Clerk:

    • Agnieszka TABERSKA

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

Representative(s) of Defendant:

DECISION IN FULL

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ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE HEARING

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EP 1 624 810 B1

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EP 1 408 850 B1

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Clarification on clarity

Case No. O2016_010 | Decision of 15 May 2019 | ‘Klarheitsprüfung bei Änderung der Patentansprüche’
Case No. O2016_011 | Decision of 15 May 2019 | ‘Klarheitsprüfung bei Änderung der Patentansprüche’

Reading time: 15 minutes

HEADNOTE in O2016_010

Art. 26, 27 PatA: Clarity on amendment of patent claims.

Lack of clarity is not a ground for invalidity. However, in order for a prayer for relief for limitation of claims in a patent nullity suit to be admissible, it must also be sufficiently determined. Therefore, the limitation of claims must be clearly formulated. The waiver of a granted independent claim constitutes a limitation of the patent, but this waiver cannot raise a question of clarity if, apart from the waiver of a granted independent claim, a mere reformulation of a granted dependent claim is made as an independent claim (¶34).

Loepfe logo

Loepfe had sued Uster Technologies AG for nullity of EP 2 347 250 (see EPO Register and Swissreg) and a divisional thereof, i.e. EP 2 352 018 (see EPO Register and Swissreg). The inventions are all about the capacitive testing of yarns or fabric, wherein the dielectric property of a capacitor arrangement is determined.

The case was split into two separate proceedings (O2016_010 for EP’250 and O2016_011 for EP’018). We have reported about the main hearing in both cases on this Blog here.

O2016_010 re EP’250

Uster logo

Uster did not defend the patent as granted but rather filed a main request (MR) and six auxiliary requests (AR1 to AR6) to maintain EP’250 in limited form. In response, Loepfe argued that all requests contained subject matter that went beyond the application as originally filed, and that all claims lacked an inventive step over several combinations of prior art documents. Novelty, however, was not at issue.

Added Matter

Loepfe alleged that several features of the MR were not disclosed in the application as originally filed. The FPC disagreed to large extent, except with regard to the feature of symmetric balancing without a reference capacitor. Briefly, the decision holds that the application as filed only disclosed symmetric balancing w a reference capacitor, and does not provide any teaching related to how symmetric balancing could be done w/o a reference capacitor. Thus, the MR failed because of added matter.

AR1 and AR2 failed for the very same reason.

AR3, however, had a reference capacitor included and could thus be considered further on the merits. Here is the structured feature analysis of AR3:


Claim 1 of AR3

In German language only; I’m sorry. Markup over claim 1 as initially granted (additions and deletions) for the changes made already in the MR; additional markup for AR3 in italic. Mere changes of the order of the features are not marked-up. Identifiers of the features are as used in the decision.

1A
Verfahren für den Symmetrieabgleich einer Vorrichtung (1)
1B
zur kapazitiven Untersuchung eines bewegten länglichen textilen Prüfgutes (9) wie Kardenband, Vorgarn, Garn oder Gewebe
1C mittels einer Kondensatoranordnung (21),
1E’
welche Vorrichtung (1) eine Auswerteschaltung (6) zur Auswertung mindestens einer elektrischen Messgrösse eines an einer die der Kondensatoranordnung (21) beinhaltenden Messschaltung (2) abgegriffenen elektrischen Signals,
1Ea
einen Referenzkondensator (22), welcher in Serie zur  Kondensatoranordnung (21) geschaltet ist,
1D’
mindestens einen Wechselsignalgenerator (3) zum Anlegen eines elektrischen Wechselsignals von zwei elektrischen Wechselspannungen mit entgegengesetzten Phasen an die Kondensatoranordnung (21) bzw. an den Referenzkondensator,
1Da’
wobei die Kondensatoranordnung (21) vom Wechselsignalgenerator (3) durch eine Filter- und/oder Verstärkerstufe (5) zur Filterung und/oder Verstärkung des vom Wechselsignalgenerator (3) erzeugten Wechselsignals derart abgekoppelt ist, dass sie Parameter des vom Wechselsignalgenerator (3) erzeugten Wechselsignals nicht beein- flusst,
1F
Abgleichmittel (4),
1G”
die in einem elektrischen Pfad zwischen dem Wechselsignalgenerator (3) und der Messschaltung (2) Filter- und/oder Verstärkerstufe (5) angeordnet sind und mittels derer mindestens ein Parameter des elektrischen Wechselsignals derart veränderbar ist,
1H
dass ein Ausgangssignal der Auswerteschaltung (6) bei definierten, konstanten Bedingungen einen bestimmten Wert, vorzugsweise Null, annimmt, und
1I
Steuermittel (7) zur Abgabe eines elektrischen Steuersignals an die Abgleichmittel (4), mittels dessen die Veränderung des mindestens einen Parameters steuerbar ist,
beinhaltet
1J
wobei die Kondensatoranordnung (21) ohne Prüfgut (9) im Wesentlichen zeitlich unverändert belassen wird,
1K’
ein elektrisches Wechselsignal von dem mindestens einen Wechselsignalgenerator (3) erzeugt und an die  Kondensatoranordnung (21) angelegt wird
1L’
ein elektrisches Ausgangssignal der Messschaltung (2) Kondensatoranordnung (21) abgegriffen wird,
1M’
mindestens eine elektrische Messgrösse des an der Messschaltung (2) Kondensatoranordnung (21) abgegriffenen elektrischen Ausgangssignals durch die Auswerteschaltung (6) ausgewertet wird,
1N”
mindestens ein Parameter des elektrischen Wechselsignals in dem elektrischen Pfad zwischen dem mindestens einen Wechselsignalgenerator (3) und der Messschaltung (2) Filter- und/oder Verstärkerstufe (5) derart durch die Abgleichmittel (4) verändert wird,
1O
dass ein Ausgangssignal der Auswertung bei definierten, konstanten Bedingungen einen bestimmten Wert, vorzugsweise Null, annimmt,
1P
die Veränderung des mindestens einen Parameters mit dem elektrischen Steuersignal durch die Steuermittel (7) gesteuert wird, und
1Q
das elektrische Steuersignal durch das Ausgangssignal beeinflusst wird.


Inventive Step of AR3

Plaintiff alleged a lack of inventive step over EP 1 124 134 (D2) in view of WO 01/31351 (D11), DE 195 35 177 (D5), US 4,843,879 (D1, referred to in EP’250, ¶[0007]), US 3,757,211 (D6), US 2007/0146019 (D4), a publication by Huang (D3) which is unfortunately not specified any further, and further in view of general knowledge.

In addition, plaintiff also alleged a lack of inventive step over D1 since the differentiating feature (arrangement of the means for balancing before the filter/amplifier) had no technical effect and could not render the claimed subject-matter inventive.

The FPC did not agree. In particular, the decision holds that the skilled person would not have considered D4, D11, D5, D6, or D3 to solve the objective technical problem which was defined as enhancing the quality of the measurement results. Note that D2 had already been cited in the patent in suit, as a result of which the objective technical problem was taken from the patent itself.

Finally, the FPC also rejected the argument that general knowledge would have led a skilled person to control the balancing means automatically. While the skilled person could arguably have done so, the decision holds that there was no teaching in D2 that would have led the skilled person to actually do it.

Consequently, the FPC concluded that AR3 was inventive over the prior art.

Clarity

An aspect of the decision that is of interest beyond the specific case is related to clarity. Plaintiff alleged that defendant’s requests for maintenance of the patent in limited form were unclear.

A Europen patent cannot be revoked for lack of clarity; the lists in Art. 138 EPC and Art. 26 PatA are closed. However, the decision holds that this must not be mixed up with requests in civil proceedings which must be clearly worded in order to be allowable. The decision holds that this is not only the case with prayers for injunctive relief (BGE 131 III 70), but also with requests for limitation of the patent in nullity proceedings. The decision goes on with a somewhat complicated derivation  with reference to BGE 92 II 280 (¶3a), 120 II 357 (¶2), 4C.108/1997 (¶3a), the corresponding practice at the EPO (G 3/14) and an analogy to Art. 97 PatR. I feel this was necessary since there is no explicit rule in the Swiss PatA that requires the amended claims to fulfil all requirements of the PatA (unlike e.g. Art. 101(3) lit. a EPC — “meet the requirements of this Convention”, what includes clarity, Art. 84 EPC).

Ein Rechtsbegehren, das einen […] unabhängigen Anspruch durch die Aufnahme eines […] abhängigen Anspruchs beschränkt, stellt keine materielle Einschränkung des erteilten abhängigen Anspruchs dar. Damit wird auf den erteilten unabhängigen Anspruch  verzichtet und der entsprechende abhängige erteilte Anspruch wird im eingeschränkten Patent als unabhängiger Anspruch weitergeführt. Der Verzicht auf den erteilten unabhängigen Anspruch bildet zwar eine Einschränkung des Patents gemäss Art. 27 Abs. 1 PatG. Dieser Verzicht kann jedoch keine Klarheitsfrage aufwerfen, denn die blosse Umformulierung des erteilten abhängigen Anspruches als unabhängiger Anspruch bildet keine weitere Einschränkung des Patents im Sinne von Art. 27 Abs. 1 PatG und kann entsprechend auch nicht auf Klarheit geprüft werden.

The bottom line is that mere combination of an independent claim with one or more dependent claims in nullity proceedings cannot be challenged with respect to clarity.


In the case at hand, the court did not see any problem re clarity. The plaintiff had basically objected to the term ‘parameter’ being unclear and that the limited claims would contradict the description. The former argument was rejected by the court because the term was already included in the claims as granted, while the latter was deemed resolved by a declaration according to Art. 97(2) PatR.

Costs

In view of the mixed outcome, the costs were split between the parties. The fact that the patent was limited by incorparation of a feature taken from the specification did not change anything in this respect since revocation of the patent had been requested in entirety.

The FPC did not follow defendant’s argument that costs incurred for the assisting patent attorney are no ‘necessary expenses’ (Art. 3 lit. a and Art. 9(2) CostR-PatC), on top of the costs for legal representation according to the tariff, if the patent attorney could have done the whole case on her/his own; Art. 29(1) PatCA. Even if the patent attorney could have run the case on his own, there is no obligation to do so. Complex legal issues may come up in the further course of the proceeding, and/or a counterclaim for infringement.

Aus der Tatsache, dass einer Partei die Möglichkeit gegeben wird, sich durch einen Patentanwalt in Nichtigkeitsprozessen vertreten zu lassen (Art. 29 PatGG),  kann weder eine Pflicht abgeleitet werden, keinen Rechtsanwalt beizuziehen, noch kann sie es rechtfertigen, wenn eine Partei von einem Rechtsanwalt vertreten wird, keine notwendigen Auslagen für den Patentanwalt mehr zuzusprechen.

Now, what is interesting is the split of costs awarded for legal representation on the one hand, and assistance of the patent attorney on the other hand. Even though the actual expenses for the patent attorney were not awarded in full, they were still awarded to an extent that is on the upper end of the tariff (CHF 44’841.20 requested, CHF 30’000,– awarded). However, compensation for legal representation was only considered on the lower end of the tariff according to Art. 4 CostR-PatC, based on a value in dispute of CHF 125’000,–.

The decision has not been appealed and has thus become final meanwhile.

O2016_011 re EP’018

Defendant filed a MR and five ARs to maintain the patent in limited form. With respect to the main request, plaintiff alleged that new matter was introduced and that the independent claim was not inventive.

Main Request: Added matter?

Plaintiff alleged that the newly introduced feature of a ‘reference capacitor different from the balancing means’ did not have sufficient basis in the application as originally filed, and that it amounts to a disclaimer.

The court did not agree that new matter was introduced. Rather, the reference capacitor and the balancing means were indeed separate entities in all embodiments of the patent. Therefore, the feature in question was directly and unambiguously derivable for the skilled person from the application as originally filed, and the main request did not contain added matter and the disclaimer argument was moot.

… but is it inventive?

No, it is not. The decision holds that the subject matter of the main request was obvious to the skilled person from EP 1 124 134 (D2) in view of the skilled person general knowledge. Plaintiff’s other arguments / combinations of prior art failed to render the subject-matter of the MR obvious.

Plan B

The FPC then moved on to AR1:


Claim 1 of AR1

In German language only; I’m sorry. Markup over claim 1 as initially granted (additions and deletions) for the changes made already in the MR; additional markup for AR1 in italic. 

1A’ Vorrichtung (1) zur Bestimmung mindestens einer dielektrischen Eigenschaft kapazitiven Untersuchung eines bewegten länglichen textilen Prüfgutes (9) wie Kardenband, Vorgarn, Garn oder Gewebe mittels
1B’ einer Kondensatoranordnung (21) mit zwei voneinander beabstandeten Platten, zwischen denen sich Luft befindet und zwischen die das
längliche textile Prüfgut (9) einführbar ist,
1C beinhaltend eine Auswerteschaltung (6) zur Auswertung mindestens
einer elektrischen Messgrösse eines an der Kondensatoranordnung
(21) abgegriffenen elektrischen Signals,
1D einen Referenzkondensator (22), welcher in Serie zur Kondensatoranordnung (21) geschaltet ist,
1E’ mindestens einen Wechselsignalgenerator (3) zum Anlegen von zwei
elektrischen Wechselspannungen mit entgegengesetzten Phasen an
die Kondensatoranordnung (21) bzw. an den Referenzkondensator
(22),
1Ea’ wobei die Kondensatoranordnung (21) vom Wechselsignalgenerator
(3) durch eine Filter- und/oder Verstärkerstufe (5) zur Filterung
und/oder Verstärkung des vom Wechselsignalgenerator (3) erzeugten
Wechselsignals derart abgekoppelt ist, dass sie Parameter des vom
Wechselsignalgenerator (3) erzeugten Wechselsignals nicht beeinflusst,
1F Abgleichmittel (4),
1G”’ die in einem elektrischen Pfad zwischen dem mindestens einen
Wechselsignalgenerator (3) und der Filter- und/oder Verstärkerstufe
(5) Kondensatoranordnung (21) angeordnet sind und mittels derer
mindestens ein Parameter des elektrischen Wechselsignals derart
veränderbar ist,
1H dass ein Ausgangssignal der Auswerteschaltung (6) bei definierten,
konstanten Bedingungen den Wert Null annimmt,
1I Steuermittel (7) zur Abgabe eines elektrischen Steuersignals an die
Abgleichmittel (4), mittels dessen die Veränderung des mindestens
einen Parameters steuerbar ist.


Contrary to plaintiff’s allegation, the court found that no new matter was introduced.

In terms of obviousness, AR1 was based on the MR, but more narrow in scope. Thus, any combination of prior art that did not render the MR obvious could consequently not render AR1 obvious. As such, the court only discussed obviousness over D2 in view of the skilled person’s general knowledge. Here, the court did rule that an inventive step was given.

EP ‘018 was thus maintained in limited form according to AR1.

Clarity and costs

No surprises here; the reasoning is essentially the same as in O2016_010, see above.

Like O2016_010, this decision has also not been appealed and has thus become final meanwhile.

Reported by Philippe KNÜSEL and Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2016_010 | Decision of 15 May 2019 | ‘Klarheitsprüfung bei Änderung der Patentansprüche’
Case No. O2016_011 | Decision of 15 May 2019 | ‘Klarheitsprüfung bei Änderung der Patentansprüche’

Gebr. Loepfe AG
./.
Uster Technologies AG

Panel of Judges:

  • Frank SCHNYDER
  • Dr. Tobias BREMI
  • Christoph MÜLLER

Judge-rapporteur:

  • Dr. Tobias BREMI

Court Clerk:

  • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

  • Dr. Simon HOLZER (MLL)
  • Dr. Kilian SCHÄRLI (MLL)
  • Dr. Kurt SUTTER (Blum), assisting in patent matters

Representative(s) of Defendant:

  • Dr. Andri HESS (Homburger)
  • Dr. Pavel PLISKA (inhouse @ Uster Technologies)

CASE NO. O2016_010
EP’250 maintained as amended
Decision of: 15 May  2019
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EP 2 347 250 B1:

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CASE NO. O2016_011
EP’018 maintained as amended
Decision of: 15 May 2019
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EP 2 352 018 B1

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Be specific!

Reading time: 9 minutes

Case No. O2016_001 | Decision of 27 June 2019

We had reported about the main hearing in this matter on this Blog here.

Comadur logo

The patent in suit is CH 707 572 B1; see Swissreg for further bibliographic information. An automated translation can be found here. Harcane had sued Comadur essentially to the effect that CH’572 be declared invalid (based on Art. 261(1) lit. a PatA, not lit. d); or, alternatively, if CH’572 was held valid, that it be transfered to Harcane. On the other hand, Comadur finally defended CH’572 with the claims being limited. Further, Comadur requested that Harcane’s complaint should be held inadmissible.

Parallel proceedings elsewhere

It is a procedural requirement that the case is not the subject of pending proceedings elsewhere or is not already the subject of a legally binding decision; Art. 59(2) lit. d and e CPC.

There had been co-pending proceedings in Neuchâtel where Comadur had sued Harcane and sought for a delaratory judgment based on the Unfair Competition Act that it was the owner of certain manufacturing processes of ceramic injection molding (CIM) material. In turn, Harcane saught a declaratory judgment in proceedings in Neuchâtel that Harcane was the owner of the respective trade secrets relating to the CIM material.

Obviously, these requests differ from the requests in proceedings at the FPC. Thus, the case that has been brought before the FPC had not been the subject of pending proceedings elsewhere. Still, the FPC had stayed its proceedings on 28 May 2018 since certain preliminary questions overlapped with the cantonal proceedings. The stay was lifted on 13 February 2019, i.e. shortly after the Supreme Court had decided on both parties’ appeals against the decision of the Neuchâtel cantonal court; see 4A_584/2017, 4A_590/2017 of 9 January 2019.

The decision holds in ¶21 that the plaintiff well has a legitimate interest in bringing the present complaint since, according to the prior cantonal proceedings, Harcane is only prohibited to use some very specific embodiments of the patent in suit. However, even the limited scope of CH’572 goes far beyond that.

limitation of the patent

The defendant / patentee partially surrendered CH’572 in accordance with Art. 24(1) lit. c PatA and declared the same to the FPC; see O2012_030, ¶17.

Claim 1 as amended reads as follows:


Claim 1 as amended

Liant pour composition de moulage par injection comprenant :

    • de 35 à 54% vol. d’une base polymérique
    • de 40 à 55% vol. d’un mélange de cires,
    • et environ 10% vol. d’un surfactant,

dans lequel la base polymérique contient des copolymères d’éthylène et d’acide méthacrylique ou acrylique, ou des copolymères d’éthylène et d’acétate de vinyle, ou des copolymères d’éthylène comprenant un anhydride maléique ou un mélange de ces copolymères, ainsi que du polyéthylène, du polypropylène et une résine acrylique, et dans lequel lesdits copolymères sont des copolymères d’éthylène et d’acide méthacrylique ou acrylique, ou des copolymères d’éthylène comprenant un anhydride maléique ou un mélange de ces copolymères;

à l’exclusion d’un liant pour composition de moulage par injection
comprenant de 35 à 50% vol d’une base polymérique, de 40 à 55 %
vol d’un mélange de cires, et environ 10% vol d’un surfactant, dans
lequel la base polymérique contient des copolymères d’éthylène et
d’acide méthacrylique ou acrylique, ou des copolymères d’éthylène
et d’acétate de vinyle, ou des copolymères d’éthylène comprenant
un anhydride maléique ou un mélange de ces copolymères, ainsi
que du polyéthylène, du polypropylène et une résine acrylique.


The underlined / italic part of the claim is a so-called undisclosed disclaimer to exclude the subject-matter of CH 708 097 A2, a prior right that had been filed earlier but published only after the filing date of CH’572. As much as I recall, this is the first time that such an undisclosed disclaimer has been at stake and allowed in proceedings at the FPC. Note, however, that O2012_030 in ¶20.1 already suggested that the FPC would follow the EPO’s precedent G 1/03.

Dependent claims 2-6 remain unchanged. Claims 7-10 have been deleted.

novelty and inventive step

The plaintiff alleged that CH’572 was not novel over US 5,266,264, several PhD theses (Juan M. Adames, 2007; S. Kowalski, 2005; C. Quinard, 2008) and a prior use, i.e. the sale of a certain feedstock to Comadur.

Apparently, the court did not appreciate how the novelty attacks had been presented. The decision holds that, according to common practice, a specific analysis of the features of the claim and a specific reference to the prior art has to be made, for each of the features. It is not the court’s task to establish the facts of its own motion and to seek the information in the references filed as exhibits. On the contrary, the relevant facts must be alleged by providing specific information, in particular by reference to a page or line number, while specifying which feature of the claim is there to be found (see ¶¶28-30).

Le Tribunal n’est pas chargé d’établir les faits d’office et il ne lui incombe pas de rechercher lui-même les informations dans les documents de l’art antérieur déposés en tant que pièce jointe. En particulier, une référence globale à un document dans le sens de «l’objet de la revendication 1 est divulgué dans le document X» ne suffit pas pour satisfaire au fardeau de l’allégation. Il faut au contraire alléguer les faits pertinents en fournissant des indications spécifiques, notamment par renvoi à un numéro de page, de ligne, tout en précisant quelle caractéristique de la revendication se retrouve dans le document de l’état de la technique invoqué.

In the absence of any specific allegations, the FPC did not consider the novelty attacks to the extent they were based on prior art documents. What remained was the sale of a certain feedstock to Comadur. However, the decision holds that these sales were governed by an NDA and thus cannot be considered at all. Further sales to third parties had been alleged but remained essentially unsubstantiated.

Accordingly, novelty was acknowledged.

The FPC did not appreciate the way the obviousness attacks had been presented, either. The decision holds that the FPC cannot complete an incomplete factual allegations of the parties. This is in contrast to proceedings at the EPO which shall examine the facts of its own motion and which shall not be restricted in this examination to the facts, evidence and arguments provided by the parties and the relief sought; Art. 114(1) EPC. Determining whether an invention is based on an inventive step is a question of law. However, the general technical knowledge of the skilled person, the closest prior art, the differentiating features, etc. are facts, and it is up to the parties to allege these facts (see ¶37).

In my perception, the considerations with respect to the burden / degree of substantiation are what this decision will likely be cited for in the future.

To the extent the FPC admitted the plaintiff’s arguments and evidence into the proceedings at all, the decision holds that the claimed subject-matter was not obvious over US 5,266,264.

Costs

Even though the plaintiff did not succeed with any request, the defendant was still charged with half of the court fee since the patent was maintained only to a limited extent, i.e. the defendant partially acknowledged the plaintiff’s complaint and both parties win and therefore lose equally.

No compensation for legal represenatation was awarded.

Interestingly, the plaintiff only involved a patent attorney when the expert opinion of the judge-rapporteur had been established. The respective expenses were not considered necessary anymore since the closure of the file had already occured at that time. On the other hand, defendant’s expenses for the assisting patent attorney of ICB, a company within the Swatch group of companies, had not been considered, either: No intra-group expenses are reimbursed; see O2014_009, ¶6.2.

UPDATE 9 September 2019:

The decision has been appealed to the Supreme Court.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. O2016_001 | Decision of 27 June 2019

Harcane Sàrl
./.
Comadur SA

Panel of Judges:

    • Dr. Mark SCHWEIZER
    • Dr. Tobias BREMI
    • Dr. Michael STÖRZBBACH
    • Dr. Regula RÜEDI
    • Dr. Thomas LEGLER

Judge-rapporteur:

    • Dr. Tobias BREMI

Court Clerk:

    • Agnieszka TABERSKA

Representative(s) of Plaintiff:

    • Jean-Claude SCHWEIZER (SLB)

Representative(s) of Defendant:

    • Dr. Nathalie TISSOT (Tissot)
    • Marie TISSOT (Tissot)
    • Thierry RAVENEL (ICB), assisting in patent matters

DECISION OF THE FPC
→ patent maintained / partially surrendered; plaintiff’s claims dismissed
Case no.: O2016_001
Decision of: 27 June 2019
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DECISION OF THE SUPREME COURT
→ referred to in ¶13 of the FPC decision
Case nos.: 4A_584/2017
4A_590/2017
Decision of: 9 January 2019
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PATENT IN SUIT

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Register ban ordered, but only after hearing the defendants

Reading time: 4 minutes

Case No. S2019_003 | Decision of 6 February 2019
Case No. S2019_003 | Decision of 11 July 2019

These two decisions in summary proceedings are heavily redacted — which is an exception to the rule. Obviously, the overall conflict between the parties also involves some criminal allegations against a natural person (Art. 146 CC; fraud).

In view of the criminal allegations I am not going to engage in any de-anonymisation exercise here; and this post is not open for comments, either.
Canton of Fribourg

A register ban for six Swiss patent applications had been issued by the public prosecutor of the Canton of Fribourg on 22 May 2017, in view of the criminal charge. The public prosecutor informed the plainfiff on 21 November 2018 of the deadline for finally lodging civil proceedings, i.e. 31 January 2019, and indicated that sequestration of the six patent applications would be lifted at that date (however, this apparently had not happened).

The plaintiff indeed initiated civil proceedings, but only on the very last day of the time limit,  and only in summary proceedings. In particular, issuance of a register ban had been requested without hearing the defendant beforehand.

While the President acting as single judge appreciated the risk that the six patent applications might be transferred to defendant (3) in view of some prior conduct of the defendant(s), and even though particular urgency was acknowledged, he did not order a register ban ex parte. The President held that the urgency is exclusively due to the late submission of the request by the plaintiff who should have taken action swiftly after the public prosecutor’s notification of 21 November 2108. If the plaintiff had filed the request in a timely manner, i.e. in early December 2018, the defendants would have had sufficient time to take a position on the request. The President held that the defendants cannot be deprived of their constitutional right to be heard because of the plaintiff’s belated action. The decision refers in passing to S2018_002, ¶7, for that a delay of two months results in the rejection of the request in any event.

The request for issuance of interim measures without hearing the defendant beforehand was thus denied with decision of 6 February 2019.

However, the register ban had still been issued with decision of 11 July 2019. In balancing the potential disadvantages suffered by the plaintiff and the defendants, the President (again acting as single judge) concluded that there was a much greater potential damage that the plaintiff would suffer if the register ban would not be issued, compared with the defendants potential damage if the register ban was granted. Nevertheless, the decision clearly notes that it is highly doubtful that the six patent applications had been contractually assigned to the plaintiff. Still, the fact that defendants (1) and (2) had previously attempted to assign the patent application to defendant (3), which is a mailbox company in Luxembourg, played out to the plaintiffs advantage, for the time being.

UPDATE 22 August 2019:

The decision of 11 July 2019 has not been appealed / is now final.

Reported by Martin WILMING

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case No. S2019_003 | Decision of 6 February 2019
Case No. S2019_003 | Decision of 11 July 2019

A. Sàrl
./.
(1) B.
(2) C.
(3) D. S.A.

Single judge:

  • Dr. Mark SCHWEIZER

Court Clerk:

  • Susanne ANDERHALDEN

Representative(s) of A.:

  • Stefano FABBRO (FLD)

Representative(s) of B.:

FIRST DECISION OF THE FPC
→ register ban denied without hearing the defendant
Case no.: S2019_003
Decision of: 6 February 2019
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SECOND DECISION OF THE FPC
→ register ban granted after hearing the defendant
Case no.: S2019_003
Decision of: 11 July 2019
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